You know, Santa Delivers

flowerbug

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I think I have my sugar addiction under control.
i am doing better than i was but i doubt i'll ever have it 100%... i'm like one of those addicts that dreams of it like i still dream of smoking once in a while (and i've not smoked a cigarette for over 43yrs) - last night i was making chocolates - the best empty calories i've had in months. :) keep it up! i feel a lot better and still have a ways to go.
 

digitS'

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This is an interesting article. It's about the science as now understood behind exercise recommendations to help us avoid and overcome health problems.

LINK (let me know if that link doesn't work for you)

I didn't know anything about this "Knowable Magazine." Well, it looks like a good source of info ;). It's new. Who do they want using this publication from their non-profit organization? Besides researchers & students -- "business people, journalists, policy makers, practitioners, patients and patient advocates, and others who wish to be informed about developments in research." Stanford University played a big part in its founding and current administration. Purpose: "Knowable Magazine is from Annual Reviews (link), a nonprofit publisher dedicated to synthesizing and integrating knowledge for the progress of science and the benefit of society." Yes! That sounds good :)!

I like the advice on not just targeting a few muscle groups but do full-body exercises. I had just be thinking how I enjoy outdoor walking but have been doing little of it. Instead, I walk indoors and since there are more turns, I walk slower and my heart doesn't reach what is thought of as a "target," in beat per minute. Therefore, I lift my arms over my head - once about every 3 steps. Okay, that would be an embarrassment if I'm out in public. Indoors, it makes both my shoulders and back feel good after a few minutes and and at the end of the 30 minutes of walking. Now the question is, how close to a full-body exercise does this "style" of walking amount to?

Steve
 

flowerbug

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Now the question is, how close to a full-body exercise does this "style" of walking amount to?

Steve
if you have some weights in your hands that would help work the upper body more than just swinging the arms. perhaps adding rocks to the pockets will help too (just don't go swimming or skating on thin ice)... since you do not care about how you look in the privacy of your own home you can start by using milk jugs partially filled up with water and add more water as you build up muscles. or perhaps Garbonzo and a friend would like rides in baskets like that? heeheehee... :)
 

digitS'

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Extra weight would be too much for me as a cardio exercise the way I'm doing it now, @flowerbug .

My heart rate reaches the target without holding anything, I would have to lift the arms less often or walk slowly or both. That's possible and might then amount to a combination of weight and cardio exercise?

Another possibility that appeals to me is what the person from the University of Wisconsin–Madison mentions in the side panel. “Six days a week, movement in the morning (usually yoga, 10 to 60 minutes). Five days a week, cardio in the evening (cycling, running, paddling, hiking at a moderate pace) 25 to 80 minutes. One to two days a week, strength training in the evening, 10 to 25 minutes."

For many years, I did a movement exercise following one television host or another before going off to work. That continued until just a couple of years ago during some months of the year. Then, show schedules or the bother to record changed my habits. I should use some imagination, fewer excuses, and get back to it.

I mean, "10 minutes" - who honestly can't arrange their day for some stretching? Sixty minutes may be too much to schedule. The 10 minutes for strength exercise a couple times a week seems even simpler. Often, I miss a day out of the week with the walking. However, often as well, it's 7 days every week that I'm tramping around, either here or somewhere. Shopping doesn't count, BTW. I have to push myself somewhat to move the heart rate a little above 100, my target. (Maybe sitting down to watch a scary movie 😳?)
 

digitS'

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Not strange how a person might feel the difference by not exercising after a 5 day hiatus.

Strange that yours truly would feel any difference with my very-limited program. But, I did!

It was just too rainy and damp in Oregon to do any walking outdoors. On the one sunny day outta 5, of course with fog hang all around on the low hills, we went for a drive to a park known for its view of Mt Hood. A glimpse of that majestic mountain was denied by the cloudy skies. I couldn't pick up any walking speed with 3 other sightseers and a snoopy dog.

Returning home, snow but I could begin again on the indoor miles ... without embarrassment 😎. Sheesh! Well, on the 2nd or 3rd day - I felt back to normal. Imagine if my daily routine amounted to more than 30 minutes ..!

Steve
 

flowerbug

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i have fond memories of driving by the Grand Teton's one day with my gf of the time and it was snowing enough that we couldn't see a thing so we had to settle for a postcard at the park headquarters/shop that we stopped at. we were the only people there. that same storm was fun to drive through across the Rockies. we were supposed to have chains, but they weren't in the truck when we went to put them on. dunno where they went. we got to Portland, hung out for a few days, packed up the stuff we went out there for and then drove back east again. some years later she moved back out there again and has stayed put for a change.
 

digitS'

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My son likes it there.

He has moved away twice and lived in several places in the US the last time. Claims to have a special appreciation for the Upper Midwest but didn't stay long.

I used to take frequent trips from one end of Oregon to the other and enjoyed avoiding the Portland metro area. It's the only densely populated area in the state. I bet it was wonderful 200 years ago!

Oh well, I guess I'm just a country boy ...

Steve
 

flowerbug

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i've enjoyed my visits to Portland, but i'm also much better a bit off in the country. i've not been back there for many years now so i'm sure much has changed.
 

digitS'

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Have you seen the expert evaluations of diet plans?

Ya know, I'm not one to imagine that my ignorance matches your knowledge (link). That just don't make no sense. However, in looking at these (https://health.usnews.com/best-diet) - there's a common thread that runs through the best. Fruits and Vegetables.

I've requested a new book from the library: Good Habits, Had Habits - by a USC professor of psychology. It was quite spur of the moment because I already consider myself as about a 65% creature of habit. Most of them are good. I'm convinced that Mom would go along with that ... she would be the best judge ;). Still, if it's the better part of 65%, there is not only room for improvement but a risk that half of what I do may not be good for me ..!

Steve
 

flowerbug

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Have you seen the expert evaluations of diet plans?

Ya know, I'm not one to imagine that my ignorance matches your knowledge (link). That just don't make no sense. However, in looking at these (https://health.usnews.com/best-diet) - there's a common thread that runs through the best. Fruits and Vegetables.

I've requested a new book from the library: Good Habits, Had Habits - by a USC professor of psychology. It was quite spur of the moment because I already consider myself as about a 65% creature of habit. Most of them are good. I'm convinced that Mom would go along with that ... she would be the best judge ;). Still, if it's the better part of 65%, there is not only room for improvement but a risk that half of what I do may not be good for me ..!

Steve
the only thing i do that is bad for me is that i'm very settled person. when i'm here on my perch for a while i don't want to get up and move. sedentary they call it. yes, that is me, sedimental... :)

fruits, veggies, moderation in animal fats for those who have the genetic traits that cause a clogging of the arteries, exercise is more important for some of us. the body needs to move - and for those with back issues, the back needs to move to be nourished properly.

and if you have a rotten diet you aren't going to be able to out-exercise it. a once-in-a-while affair with a pizza won't do you in, but that is for you and your scale to figure out. i won't surely interfere. :) my mistresses are sugars, pastries, custards, frostings, chocolates, etc. i'm doing better this year than i have in the past so i'll keep on this journey. my old default meal would be two sandwiches no matter how hungry i was, now i make half a sandwich to start. the challenge is getting Mom to recognize what i mean when i say i want a small salad. snacks at night are tough to avoid, but i'm also getting better there.

those are pretty much the habits i am working on for this winter. adding a bit more exercise to my weekly routine - much better than jumping to conclusions or throwing hissy fits over things that won't change. :)
 

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