Beekissed

Garden Master
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
5,054
Reaction score
6,797
Points
377
Location
Eastern Panhandle, WV
Was wondering if you could cover that amount of space with round bales of hay? They roll out pretty easily and cover quite a bit of ground, though it may take several to cover that much space.

I would LOVE to save all my own seed, but so far have only done tomato, squash, peppers, cukes...those things with larger seeds. I'd love to collect seed from the lettuces and such as well.
 

Beekissed

Garden Master
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
5,054
Reaction score
6,797
Points
377
Location
Eastern Panhandle, WV
You can get new chickens in the spring

NY, I don't want to speak for RR in any way, but unless I'm not mistaken after reading his many posts here and on BYC, RR is not just someone who keeps chickens. To give up a flock of chickens you've been developing for years and sometimes for decades isn't as simple as getting rid of those and just buying more in the spring. You can't just go out and buy the quality you've grown and developed, so the joy of keeping a flock of chickens is greatly diminished at that point.

To truly tend a flock of chickens, not just for eggs/meat or as a hobby or on a whim, is to be dedicated to the development of a breed or a flock to the point that you put your heart into it, much of your time and thoughts, your learning and doing is tied up in what you developed out there in that coop.

It would be akin to asking a master wood craftsmen to sell all his fine hand crafted furniture he made over the years and go buy some cheapy furniture comprised of chip board from the local Big Lots.
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,227
Reaction score
10,049
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
You can get new chickens in the spring

I'd still be tied down. Animals do that to you. Things change. Neighbors' kids I used have grown up and moved away. Leukemia has struck one family hard, I can't ask them at this time and I expect them to soon move away. As much as she is hurting I'm not even sure I want her to last until Christmas. Other people I've relied on in the past just aren't available. It's not an overnight decision.

Bee, I appreciate your words. I had developed those chickens to a flock I wanted, behaviors as much as appearances, eggs, or meat. I would not be opposed to starting over and developing a different flock, I'd sure do some things differently. In some ways it would be fun, starting over. But I can't get around the tied down part. If I can't take care of animals right I won't have any. I'm to that point.
 

RUNuts

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Oct 6, 2017
Messages
133
Reaction score
254
Points
133
Location
Eastern Houton
Livestock, any of it, is a daily joy and chore. I planned to travel more, but that wasn't an option. So, got chickens. Things slowed down more and started a garden. New project and so many things to learn.

Will be interesting to see where (if and when) our kids settle. My siblings were raised as Military Brats and we aren't tied to one location. We chased the four winds. Travel is nice. Grandkids nicer!

Best wishes and hope you have a Merry Christmas!
 

seedcorn

Garden Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
9,627
Reaction score
9,882
Points
397
Location
NE IN
Tromboncino squash-tell me about them. Taste, how you eat? Sounds like it has a huge plant.
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,227
Reaction score
10,049
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
Tromboncino squash-tell me about them. Taste, how you eat? Sounds like it has a huge plant.

Somebody on here told me about them a few years back so I tried them. The plant runs a lot like a pumpkin but, runs a long way, but I grow mine on a fence. It is a big plant. The squash can get pretty big, over two feet long. I use it like a yellow summer squash, get them while they are fairly young and cook them. I usually steam them, can't remember for how long. They are green but if you like a yellow summer squash you should like how they taste.

I've read you can let them mature and they can be eaten like a winter squash. I tried that and was not impressed. I only eat them steamed when young or something like that.

Squash bugs are attracted to them but they usually don't kill them, at least not here. Squash bugs destroy my zucchini and yellow squash about the time they start bearing.
 

seedcorn

Garden Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
9,627
Reaction score
9,882
Points
397
Location
NE IN
So more like yellow squash than zucchini? Stink bugs kill my zucchini. Soap water doesn’t seem to phase them.

I like zucchini for Fries, relish and bread.
 

baymule

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2011
Messages
18,369
Reaction score
34,724
Points
457
Location
Trinity County Texas
I grew them, told everybody about them. @Ridgerunner bought seed and planted them, so did @catjac1975 She posted a thread titled A squash bigger than 2 little boys. She updated it this year, comparing her grandsons to the size of the squash.

IMG1180.jpg


IMG1075.jpg


They do make big vines that will trellis or run all over the place. One thing I discovered, they will root at the leaf joints if allowed to run on the ground, so if squash borers get to them, the newest growth keeps living. The long neck is seed free, the seeds are in the bulb at the end.
 

Latest posts

Top