2022 Little Easy Bean Network - We Are Beans Without Borders

flowerbug

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Thanks for the info. Most interesting.

I remember reading years (decades) ago that white seeded varieties of stringbeans (snap beans, green beans) were bred to replace the brown seeded varieties because of canning. The brown seeded varieties had a an off color water that was unappealing, while the white seeded ones did not. At least this was done for the Blue Lake variety. Probably old news, but I thought I'd throw it out there.

to me they just don't have the flavor. since i like Pinto beans quite a bit i was happy with them but Mom considers the juice sludge (that's actually what she calls it! ), to me that's so much flavor. anyways, as i keep talking about Purple Dove beans all the time one part of why i like it as a dry bean is that it has a mild Pinto flavor. so to me it a compromise because it isn't as dark and not as much flavor but it can be mixed with white beans in soups and i'm quite happy.
 

Bluejay77

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I remember reading years (decades) ago that white seeded varieties of stringbeans (snap beans, green beans) were bred to replace the brown seeded varieties because of canning. The brown seeded varieties had a an off color water that was unappealing, while the white seeded ones did not. At least this was done for the Blue Lake variety. Probably old news, but I thought I'd throw it out there.
That's true about modern white seeded beans. Bred because they don't discolor the jar water in the canning process and storing. They took most all the colored bush snap bean varieties and bred up white seeded versions. How about the classic white seeded Tenderpod or White Seeded Pencil Pod, wax. I think those beans should have been given a new name and described as similar to. I think more people today freeze beans anyway and I am partial to the classic versions of these white seeded ones. To me storing beans soaking in jars of water is deplorable. Also boiling vegetables in water and destroying their flavor to me is sacriligious. I steam cook all vegies.
 
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Jack Holloway

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That's true about modern white seeded beans. Bred because they don't discolor the jar water in the canning process and storing. They took most all the colored bush snap bean varieties and bred up white seeded versions. How about the classic white seeded Tenderpod or White Seeded Pencil Pod, wax. I think those beans should have been given a new name and described as similar to. I think more people today freeze beans anyway and I am partial to the classic versions of these white seeded ones. To me storing beans soaking in jars of water is deplorable. Also boiling vegetables in water and destroying their flavor to me is sacriligious. I steam cook all vegies.
Guess I'm weird (no surprise there), but I like the mushy canned beans. Can't stand the frozen. Even some canned beans now-a-days are like frozen. But then I don't like al dente pasta either.

On a seperate note, this season has not been good for me and beans. I'm happy I only planted half of each variety cause I'm not sure what I'll be able to harvest.
 

Bluejay77

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Guess I'm weird (no surprise there), but I like the mushy canned beans. Can't stand the frozen. Even some canned beans now-a-days are like frozen. But then I don't like al dente pasta either.

When I steam cook vegies they are not El Dante. Well done with good color.
 

ducks4you

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That's true about modern white seeded beans. Bred because they don't discolor the jar water in the canning process and storing. They took most all the colored bush snap bean varieties and bred up white seeded versions. How about the classic white seeded Tenderpod or White Seeded Pencil Pod, wax. I think those beans should have been given a new name and described as similar to. I think more people today freeze beans anyway and I am partial to the classic versions of these white seeded ones. To me storing beans soaking in jars of water is deplorable. Also boiling vegetables in water and destroying their flavor to me is sacriligious. I steam cook all vegies.
How do you store your whole beans? Frozen only? Pls describe. Thx! :hugs
 

meadow

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Thanks for the info. Most interesting.

I remember reading years (decades) ago that white seeded varieties of stringbeans (snap beans, green beans) were bred to replace the brown seeded varieties because of canning. The brown seeded varieties had a an off color water that was unappealing, while the white seeded ones did not. At least this was done for the Blue Lake variety. Probably old news, but I thought I'd throw it out there.
Oh! How interesting! I'd not heard about brown seeds discoloring the canning liquid. Burpee's shows Blue Lake in both white and black seeded varieties starting in 1951. I suppose black seeds would cause even more discoloration.

What surprises me is that they seemed to be promoting the White-Seeded KY Wonder as dual purpose because the seeds were such a pure white color:

"The dry beans are half an inch long and of the purest pearly whiteness, making them most desirable also for winter use."

I wonder if there was some cosmetic or cultural preference for dry white beans in the same way that there was for white eggs?
 

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