2022 Little Easy Bean Network - We Are Beans Without Borders

meadow

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Can't see if you said, is it the 12", 14", or 16" one?
He says that he chose the Tall (14") over the People's (12") because of the leverage that would be provided by the longer handles. He decided against the Farmer (16") because, although it has longer tines, the handles are the same length (plus with extra weight and cost, the 14" seemed like the sweet spot).

He thinks it would pry bramble roots out better than shovel and pick, but he hasn't tried it (our brambles are either along a fence or under a tree). It did pull up quack grass roots "like crazy" and also the odd tree root from a tree that fell 15 years ago.

If the ground is really rocky, you'll have trouble driving it in (we have one area that had formerly been a horseshoe pit and he couldn't use it there).
 

Zeedman

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He is the proud owner of a Meadow Creature broadfork and keeps looking for more areas to dig up! 😆 Best purchase ever!

If the ground is really rocky, you'll have trouble driving it in (we have one area that had formerly been a horseshoe pit and he couldn't use it there).
I've thought about getting one of those - but for the most part, I would just be rock mining. :lol: It took years for DW & me to de-rock our gardens; she built a whole rock garden on both sides of our culvert with those rocks.

A broadfork might be useful though for prepping beds for root crops. My tillers only go down to about 6"... and I really don't want them to go deeper (see: rock mining). The broadfork - if it can get it in past the rocks - could loosen the soil without turning it over.
 

Zeedman

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i sure wish someone had more information about what the possible parent beans were as i've not seen any others like them (so far :) ).

i have guesses and theories but that's as far as i've been able to get.
I'm not sure if Robert kept records of parentage - or whether his crosses were planned, or just the results of natural crossing (such as the segregations here). He grew a lot of bush beans, offering 116 varieties in his last SSE listing.

In 2006 (the year of Robert's passing) I tried to get copies of Robert's soybean development records, to evaluate whether I would grow any of those in progress. They were included in the soybean inventory sent by his estate, listed only by numbers. But the manager of the estate was unwilling to copy the breeding records, or allow me to view them there. As a result, I didn't request any of those soybeans, and they were probably lost. :( Presumably there were bean breeding records as well. I seem to recall that pinto beans were one parent of several of his original introductions.

If anyone was able to obtain records of Robert's bean projects, it was probably Dr. Alan Kapular (Peace Seeds) who was focusing his rescue efforts on Robert's beans. As a plant breeder, Alan would have been best qualified to use that info.
 

jbosmith

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I've thought about getting one of those - but for the most part, I would just be rock mining. :lol: It took years for DW & me to de-rock our gardens; she built a whole rock garden on both sides of our culvert with those rocks.

A broadfork might be useful though for prepping beds for root crops. My tillers only go down to about 6"... and I really don't want them to go deeper (see: rock mining). The broadfork - if it can get it in past the rocks - could loosen the soil without turning it over.
As someone who stubbornly keeps trying to use a broadfork in glacial till, I can say with experience that it's best to start with a smaller garden fork. My broadfork tines are probably twice as long as a standard garden fork, and I have yet to feel like I've done much beyond poking some holes in the old tiller pan in those gardens. It's great in my two sandy gardens though.
 

flowerbug

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...
If anyone was able to obtain records of Robert's bean projects, it was probably Dr. Alan Kapular (Peace Seeds) who was focusing his rescue efforts on Robert's beans. As a plant breeder, Alan would have been best qualified to use that info.

Dr. Alan Kapuler has quite a lot of various websites and i wonder if he actually monitors them much now as it appears he may be old enough to have retired. if you know anyone out west who may be in contact with him it may be worth a question? :)

i'm young enough to seed collecting and bean lore that he probably would ignore an inquiry even if i could find the way to contact him.

what writings of his i've come across seem interesting and more positive so i'm glad he's done what he has accomplished. hope he is well and alert.
 

meadow

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A broadfork might be useful though for prepping beds for root crops. My tillers only go down to about 6"... and I really don't want them to go deeper (see: rock mining). The broadfork - if it can get it in past the rocks - could loosen the soil without turning it over.
A garden fork works well to loosen without turning too. I love my old fork from (now defunct) Smith & Hawkins! It's the type with a "D" handle.

The 12" broadfork would do the job faster and easier; it needn't be plunged into the ground all of the way.
 

Zeedman

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Dr. Alan Kapuler has quite a lot of various websites and i wonder if he actually monitors them much now as it appears he may be old enough to have retired. if you know anyone out west who may be in contact with him it may be worth a question? :)

Or speak to his daughter? (via Peace Seedlings)
That would be my suggestion as well. Dr. Kapular has apparently retired, having dropped out of SSE & passed his seed company on to his daughter. If he does reply, and had access to Robert's breeding info, you will probably get a very detailed answer.
 

flowerbug

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Tinker's Fire. i see now that i missed at least one cut short bean in there that i won't replant ever. oops. :)

DSC_20221212_101343-0500_1832_Tinkers_Fire_thm.jpg


 
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