AMKuska's 2020 Garden

baymule

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I have a coop in my garden and the chickens get turned out in the fall/winter. I meant to take it down this past summer, but didn't get around to it.
 

AMKuska

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It happened again @digitS' this time in the grow tent and the flower wasn’t ready yet. It died before the flower opened or even turned all the way orange.
 

digitS'

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The flowers must be the most fragile part of nearly any plant.

We are told that our own bodies fight off potential infections on a daily basis. Symptoms may be unnoticed or minor. We understand that this is happening with all life forms - every one. It's a Zoo out there! Well, it's more than that ... fortunately, many relationships are as partners.

If you don't look to hard at some of the extreme examples, I wonder if the flower damage might be found here:


digitS'
 

flowerbug

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i think most squash plants are going to put out male flowers first, so to have an early flower die off right away is probably normal...

is it getting cold there yet?
 

AMKuska

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@flowerbug this flower was definitely female, it was sitting on a fruit the size of a man's thumb before the whole hting died.
 

Zeedman

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It happened again @digitS' this time in the grow tent and the flower wasn’t ready yet. It died before the flower opened or even turned all the way orange.
The only possibilities that I can come up with are that the plant is either (a) too young, or (b) under stress of some kind. Stress is a broad category, but disease, temperature, nutrient, or water stress are some of the most common. Under those circumstances, it is not uncommon for a plant to abort flowers until it has become vigorous enough to support a developing fruit.
 

AMKuska

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The only possibilities that I can come up with are that the plant is either (a) too young, or (b) under stress of some kind. Stress is a broad category, but disease, temperature, nutrient, or water stress are some of the most common. Under those circumstances, it is not uncommon for a plant to abort flowers until it has become vigorous enough to support a developing fruit.
This plant was planted around Sep. 1st, is that too young for fruit do you think?
 

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