At The Table

digitS'

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No bugs! (Except by accident ... :))!

Clam digging of several varieties has been part of my adventures. Fun digging razor clams in Pacific Ocean sand. You walk along the beach and look for little dimples, maybe with a bubble on the surface. Move to the ocean side and begin digging. More experienced clammers told me that the clam can slide off deeper itself, if given any time.

There was a recent PBS show that featured abalone loss. It looked so possible to me for a long time and the harvesting must have become unsustainable with so many environmental pressures. I see that Australia is dealing with the problem, as well. Nice, big, meaty clam - I didn't live where I could go diving for them. Well, not after I was 3 years old ;).

Steve
 

Zeedman

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20, about 10 of which I will probably never eat again. I'm surprised balut isn't on that list, or ghost peppers.

Had raw fish, octopus, and heaven knows what else when I was invited to a party in Japan. I was determined to make a good impression, so ate whatever sushi was put in front of me. I was so convincing that they brought me a second plate! :th

Tried Durian when I was in Thailand. Some of the hotels there have "no durian!" signs, because of the strong odor. The durian I tried had already been segmented & packaged - with the seed still inside each segment. Having never seen durian before & not knowing better, I ate a couple of the raw seeds too, which to me appeared to have been rolled inside. It turns out the raw seeds are toxic - it really upset my stomach for a day.

Much to my surprise, durian is beginning to appear in U.S. markets. I just saw some yesterday in the Oriental market we buy fruit from. They have had durian candy too - which I once dumped on the "freebee" table at work. Almost everyone tried it; the reactions were priceless. o_O:lol: I suspect that prank will be remembered for years.

The same Oriental market often has whole jackfruit (some as big as a large watermelon) and recently had breadfruit. Hard to believe jackfruit & durian grow in trees. :hide
 

baymule

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25. Plus some things not listed. Armadillo, those things are a challenge to shuck out of their shells, takes both hands and feet. BBQ’ed, tasted like pork, guess that’s why, during the Depression, they were called Hoover hogs. LOL
 

digitS'

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There's @baymule in the southern states with my score. Now, I'll try to cheat :D. (@Ridgerunner is too cosmopolitan with his travels and living in Cajun country ;).)
Much to my surprise, durian is beginning to appear in U.S. markets
See, I might have been one of those sampling the candy you brought to work. Different setting but candy is still a possibility but, no, I have never sampled the fresh fruit.

You see, the urban center most likely to be visited when I was growing up was San Francisco. My family was also more likely to visit Chinese and Mexican restaurants back home. Why go out for "home cooking?" But, turn a teenager loose in Frisco ..!

China Town felt like I had traveled half way around the world! My first contacts with @Zeedman was in an effort to learn more about soy but also adzuki beans. They were later and in a Vancouver BC Chinatown bakery in these tasty little desserts. Yum! (Couldn't even get my adzuki plants to mature viable seeds :(.)

Anyway, venturing into the new was great fun and like @flowerbug , I couldn't always know what was in the "headcheese." ;)

Steve
 

Messybun

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Most of this is an adventurous foods list. But some of those things I thought were part of a normal diet lol! Who hasn’t eaten a spam sauerkraut sandwich? Or sauerkraut anything, it’s just so good!
 

Artichoke Lover

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Most of this is an adventurous foods list. But some of those things I thought were part of a normal diet lol! Who hasn’t eaten a spam sauerkraut sandwich? Or sauerkraut anything, it’s just so good!
That was my impression too. Crab, sauerkraut, spam, scallops, and oysters, venison, blue cheese were pretty normal foods here. I’d eaten most of those at least once before I was 10! So are chicken feet, chicken livers, and frog legs. Though I still haven’t tried them. Everything I’ve listed except venison and frog legs can be bought at the local grocery here.
 

digitS'

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@Rhodie Ranch , I've raised and butchered rabbit to sell to a neighbor. The neighbor kid and I had a project in his mother's unused little greenhouse for awhile. (This was after DB overwhelmed my little rabbit enterprise in the chicken house (& then walked away from it). This was my first experience in a greenhouse - found it a pleasant place ;). Never ate one of the rabbits ...

@Messybun , I've never had sauerkraut on spam. Used it for breakfast with eggs, mostly.

I brought a few people to "fly fishing" for frogs at night. Too much of a bother with the boat and all for the limited catch, no matter where I tried it. One place was very near @Rhodie Ranch 's home on the Rogue River ;). Ate those frog legs from the expeditions. Proverbially, "tasted like chicken."

Don't care much for liver no matter what the critter. Had plenty from beef, growing up. Chicken Feet?! I've seen where those feet have been!

Steve
 

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