At The Table

flowerbug

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I really like some brands of wild caught sardines in olive oil. They are tasty with crackers! I wouldn't be able to eat them in a competition though as more than one can would make me sick! :)

lightly smoked in oil is my favorite way to have them, but i've eaten them so many ways that i really don't mind how they're done. i guess i would not like them in my rice pudding but perhaps i'd eat that too if i were hungry enough. :)
 

flowerbug

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Speaking of odd things at the table.....

A few weeks ago, I bought a package of country ham (as in prosciutto type ham) from my local cheese shop. On the instructions it said "cook to 165 degrees" So I did even though I have NEVER heard of HAVING to cook country ham. As I suspected it came out terrible, a dry super salty mess.

So when I went back, I mentioned this, and they were as baffled as I was why they would include such a instruction. They assured me that the ham was as edible uncooked as any other country ham and I got another pack. Not saying I LIKED it (even raw it was way saltier than such a ham should be) but at least it tasted sort of like ham (the balance of the pack is in the refrigerator waiting for me to make something where it's saltiness will be usable, like Shanghai Winter Melon Soup.

Now I just have to remember to tell them that from now on they have to slice the fuet I buy, as they are now too hard to cut or chew.

i have had country ham once, it was ok, but since i rarely add salt to any thing i make it's a bit too too much for me even when used in something else which dilutes the salt.

fuet i had to look up, sounds good! i don't mind sausage with some tooth to it. :)
 

Pulsegleaner

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i have had country ham once, it was ok, but since i rarely add salt to any thing i make it's a bit too too much for me even when used in something else which dilutes the salt.

fuet i had to look up, sounds good! i don't mind sausage with some tooth to it. :)

There's having some tooth to it, and there's the same consistency as a wood board! I have VERY strong teeth. If I can't chew through it, it's objectively too hard.
 

digitS'

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It isn't on the original but I had Dragon Fruit recently. Whaaa? People eat that sour stuff - says Steve, sitting here with his bowl of Galia melon ;).

I just checked Wikipedia and Dragon Fruit is from the American continent. It is grown in the USA! Reading about it, the fruit sounds as though it is quite popular with people in far away places. Sounds like tomatoes - where Americans had to have Italian immigrants and others teach us the value.

(Reminds me, you tomato historians, did we ever find out if northern Native Americans grew tomatoes before the coming of Europeans? Is the Cherokee Purple something of a new thing?)

Durian cookies were re-sampled and I still don't know what some folks find objectionable. I haven't ever eaten the fresh fruit and the testimonials have me reluctant to go out of my way to try it.

Steve
 

Zeedman

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Personally, I love dragon fruit. It is the fruit of a cactus, but less seedy than some cactus fruit (such as prickly pear). The red ones are much better than the yellow ones IMO. If they were cheaper (they're definitely not) I would eat them more often.

Durian is an acquired taste. Probably more palatable in prepared products such as cookies, where the aroma has been processed out. I'm really surprised to see fresh durian beginning to appear more widely in the U.S.
 

Phaedra Geiermann

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It isn't on the original but I had Dragon Fruit recently. Whaaa? People eat that sour stuff - says Steve, sitting here with his bowl of Galia melon ;).

I just checked Wikipedia and Dragon Fruit is from the American continent. It is grown in the USA! Reading about it, the fruit sounds as though it is quite popular with people in far away places. Sounds like tomatoes - where Americans had to have Italian immigrants and others teach us the value.

(Reminds me, you tomato historians, did we ever find out if northern Native Americans grew tomatoes before the coming of Europeans? Is the Cherokee Purple something of a new thing?)

Durian cookies were re-sampled and I still don't know what some folks find objectionable. I haven't ever eaten the fresh fruit and the testimonials have me reluctant to go out of my way to try it.

Steve
I love dragon fruit but too expensive here in Germany, well, import nowadays is even more expensive.

Dragon eye fruit is also charming, fresh or smoked.

Durian, my former boss is a Singaporean and his hobby is finding good food, haha, so I got a lot of chance to try what he recommended and led us to. Durian is one of what I once had no interest, but after tasting the real good and fresh one, I am totally ok with it.
 

Phaedra Geiermann

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I've read about Kim chi, if I ever find another descent cabbage I will try to make this. I love chili's and will look up a recipe. Keeping a jar in my kitchen ready ;)
Kimchi is super! It always has a place in our freezer :D

When I have time, i will make some by myself, or purchase them from Korean shops. It can be used for so many different dishes.
 

heirloomgal

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Adding to your list?

It isn't on the original but I had Dragon Fruit recently. Whaaa? People eat that sour stuff - says Steve, sitting here with his bowl of Galia melon ;).

I just checked Wikipedia and Dragon Fruit is from the American continent. It is grown in the USA! Reading about it, the fruit sounds as though it is quite popular with people in far away places. Sounds like tomatoes - where Americans had to have Italian immigrants and others teach us the value.

(Reminds me, you tomato historians, did we ever find out if northern Native Americans grew tomatoes before the coming of Europeans? Is the Cherokee Purple something of a new thing?)

Durian cookies were re-sampled and I still don't know what some folks find objectionable. I haven't ever eaten the fresh fruit and the testimonials have me reluctant to go out of my way to try it.

Steve
Tomatoes originated in South America, and there were no beefsteaks to be found in the originals! Lol It's actually quite amazing how remarkable (and yummy) the results of selective breeding turned out, for many vegetables including tomatoes. There are some good tasting wild foods out there, berries in particular, but without domestication efforts in veggies there tends to be bitterness, and lots of seeds. Small vegetables too.
 
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