Best Composting Tips

Alasgun

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I agree. This is a 20 ft long double bin, 8 ft wide. Each 10ft. Section has a movable divider that allows me to flip it from one to the next pretty easy. I use a thermometer to determine when to turn it. Once i started using it, i didn’t have to turn it as often. When it’s 135 or above; i leave it alone. In our season it’s turned 3 times in the summer.
 

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ducks4you

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@Branching Out, I used to dump my coffee grounds in a used ice cream plastic tub with a handle and dump it in my garden. Stopped doing that and dumped the used filter and the grounds into my burn barrel.
I went back to saving the grounds again. Next week I will need to put them into the garden and I think I will spread them out in my big garden to help hold moisture for the vegetables to be planted there in March and April.
 

Branching Out

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Over the course of the year I add many thin sprinklings of coffee grounds to the rhododendrons, blueberries, and raspberries-- basically all of the acid loving plants. I can't say for sure whether it helps, but I am guessing that it must add organic matter which provides food for the worms and other soil dwelling creatures. Then about once a month or so I add some to the compost bin as well, and then top the coffee grounds with a layer of brown leaves. My kind of lasagna!
 

Branching Out

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I just culled most of a mixed cover crop that got away from me a bit, so now I have a rather substantial pile of brassica stalks to contend with. All were flowering, and some have seed pods developing. I am not super concerned about the potential for reseeding, as these are tillage radish and I find them easy to pull if they sprout in a spot where they are not wanted.

My question is this: is it okay to compost large amounts of brassica green waste? I have lots of weeds and annual flowers that I deadhead and add to the compost, so it would get mixed in over time. The plan is for the compost to sit for at least a year to age and mature once it's had a chance to break down.
 

Alasgun

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I’ve never had a problem with a large quantity of any input, in another month I’ll have all the leftovers from the first broccoli and even though they are quite course; they always go away. Tree Leaves are fragile/light and breakdown fast so I don’t bother covering them because they get stirred in when the pile is turned. Something course I always fork down into the heat and cover them with the hot, already working stuff. Once I incorporated a thermometer my composting became easier and yielded better results. Prior to using it I’d just turn the pile and wet it down whenever i Had an hour to spare. Many times this was premature.
After a thermometer I’d put a manure source next n the list for its importance.
 

Dirtmechanic

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That is a brilliant idea Dirtmechanic!
It belongs to these guys. But I have a heavy duty sewing machine and fully intend to use weed fabric in a way for which it is not intended.


 

digitS'

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Sandbags for a living terrace wall !

I like that idea. The idea of terracing a hillside and creating a level garden where there was not level ground to begin with, fits well with an appreciation for gardening in beds and permanent paths.

Noninvasive plants for living walls would certainly be helpful and attractive. That could be quite an appropriate research project on good choices. Perhaps, small shrubs ... ferns would certainly look good in shade.
 

Dirtmechanic

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Sandbags for a living terrace wall !

I like that idea. The idea of terracing a hillside and creating a level garden where there was not level ground to begin with, fits well with an appreciation for gardening in beds and permanent paths.

Noninvasive plants for living walls would certainly be helpful and attractive. That could be quite an appropriate research project on good choices. Perhaps, small shrubs ... ferns would certainly look good in shade.
I only have one teensy tidal wave of a concern. If I make it too mucky, where it does not drain well, then a classic problem also found in hugelkulture of hillsides can occur. Water can build up if not allowed to drain, and since it is so heavy it can burst a dam. It is best if nothing of value is below when the wave comes. I will have to watch out.
 

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