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digitS'

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@R2elk , The article: "Lemon Boy Plus has a yellow color ..."
The catalog: "... fruits have a unique yellow color ..."

The 6 - 7 ounce in the catalog is listed for both.

Descriptions from one seed company to another tend to vary, I've noticed. Some use exactly the same wording as appears on the wholesaler's site. Variations suggest that growing experiences differ. My Lemon Boys were not usually as small as 6 ounces.

That should be a given. Differences will exist in practices, soil, climate, etc.

Color means not very much to me, once I moved past the attitude that all tomatoes should be red about 30 years ago. DW had a lot to do with that. She seemed to associate large fruit size with stronger flavors, something that she didn't really appreciate. My thinking was that lighter color might mean milder flavor and be more acceptable to her. Mostly, this was true.

Anyway, it resulted in trials of a number of varieties. Healthy, productive varieties are the characteristics that I am concerned with. I'm no tomato connoisseur. Good Gravy. I would require far wider experiences in geography or home growing conditions to explore what is available at the moment.

Steve
 

flowerbug

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the main aspects of tomato varieties i need to have for them to work here are they have to be acidic enough for canning, they should be big enough, enough juice and meat in about the right proportions. disease resistance is important but it seems we don't ever get them to go as well as the Balls Beefsteaks we used to get.

after this past year i added another feature required. they have to be soft enough so they actually feel like a tomato instead of a lump of styrofoam.

the first aspect though is flavor. if they don't have much flavor i'll keep looking for something else instead. i don't grow backyard tomatoes just to have them end up tasting like what we get from the stores.
 

R2elk

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@R2elk , The article: "Lemon Boy Plus has a yellow color ..."
The catalog: "... fruits have a unique yellow color ..."

The 6 - 7 ounce in the catalog is listed for both.

Descriptions from one seed company to another tend to vary, I've noticed. Some use exactly the same wording as appears on the wholesaler's site. Variations suggest that growing experiences differ. My Lemon Boys were not usually as small as 6 ounces.

That should be a given. Differences will exist in practices, soil, climate, etc.

Color means not very much to me, once I moved past the attitude that all tomatoes should be red about 30 years ago. DW had a lot to do with that. She seemed to associate large fruit size with stronger flavors, something that she didn't really appreciate. My thinking was that lighter color might mean milder flavor and be more acceptable to her. Mostly, this was true.

Anyway, it resulted in trials of a number of varieties. Healthy, productive varieties are the characteristics that I am concerned with. I'm no tomato connoisseur. Good Gravy. I would require far wider experiences in geography or home growing conditions to explore what is available at the moment.

Steve
Lemon Boy Plus is not the only orange tomato that I have seen advertised as yellow. I have grown Lemon Boy for years and can guarantee it is a yellow tomato. The online images I found for Lemon Boy Plus are definitely orange. Orange tomatoes do not taste the same as yellow tomatoes.
 

R2elk

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the main aspects of tomato varieties i need to have for them to work here are they have to be acidic enough for canning, they should be big enough, enough juice and meat in about the right proportions. disease resistance is important but it seems we don't ever get them to go as well as the Balls Beefsteaks we used to get.

after this past year i added another feature required. they have to be soft enough so they actually feel like a tomato instead of a lump of styrofoam.

the first aspect though is flavor. if they don't have much flavor i'll keep looking for something else instead. i don't grow backyard tomatoes just to have them end up tasting like what we get from the stores.
I think you are overrating acidity as a requirement for canning. I have canned low acid pink and yellow tomatoes just fine without adding acid to them. The key ingredient that I found necessary was to add one teaspoon of salt to each quart jar of tomatoes. The ones that I did not add salt to did not keep well at all. The ones that I added salt to kept just fine for years.
 

flowerbug

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I think you are overrating acidity as a requirement for canning. I have canned low acid pink and yellow tomatoes just fine without adding acid to them. The key ingredient that I found necessary was to add one teaspoon of salt to each quart jar of tomatoes. The ones that I did not add salt to did not keep well at all. The ones that I added salt to kept just fine for years.

aside from the fact that i rarely add salt to cooking here i'm not too likely to change my taste preferences for tomatoes and canning. i also don't care to risk botulism poisoning. that said, i have tried some lower acid tomatoes and i didn't find them very good but as i said taste preferences are different. and then it would also have to get the approval from The Management and she's pretty set in her ways even more so than i am. :)

i'll explain the no salt thing a bit more, but we generally put up tomatoes to be used as ingredients for other dishes later through the next year or two so it also usually doesn't make sense to add salt if we want to use them for things that are not salty in the final dishes. one of our main meals is a dish of tomatoes and macaroni. we don't salt the water to boil the pasta and we don't salt the dish after it is made. the most salt that might get added is perhaps in the butter which may or may not get added after it is warmed up. a very simple meal. i don't want it salted. in some other dishes where we're using meats and/or cheeses there is usually enough salt in those that we don't need to add more to suit our tastes. many times there is garlic bread served along with it which does have salt on it. that's plenty enough.
 

R2elk

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aside from the fact that i rarely add salt to cooking here i'm not too likely to change my taste preferences for tomatoes and canning. i also don't care to risk botulism poisoning. that said, i have tried some lower acid tomatoes and i didn't find them very good but as i said taste preferences are different. and then it would also have to get the approval from The Management and she's pretty set in her ways even more so than i am. :)

i'll explain the no salt thing a bit more, but we generally put up tomatoes to be used as ingredients for other dishes later through the next year or two so it also usually doesn't make sense to add salt if we want to use them for things that are not salty in the final dishes. one of our main meals is a dish of tomatoes and macaroni. we don't salt the water to boil the pasta and we don't salt the dish after it is made. the most salt that might get added is perhaps in the butter which may or may not get added after it is warmed up. a very simple meal. i don't want it salted. in some other dishes where we're using meats and/or cheeses there is usually enough salt in those that we don't need to add more to suit our tastes. many times there is garlic bread served along with it which does have salt on it. that's plenty enough.
One teaspoon of salt in one quart of tomatoes does not make the tomatoes taste salty. It does aid in the preservation of canned tomatoes. Finishing the process by water bath is also required.

I do not add additional salt to macaroni and tomatoes.

Trying to eliminate all salt from your diet can be harmful as your body requires sodium and chloride to function properly.
 

flowerbug

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One teaspoon of salt in one quart of tomatoes does not make the tomatoes taste salty. It does aid in the preservation of canned tomatoes. Finishing the process by water bath is also required.

I do not add additional salt to macaroni and tomatoes.

Trying to eliminate all salt from your diet can be harmful as your body requires sodium and chloride to function properly.

we do not normally add salt to foods so adding that much salt to a quart of tomatoes would be very noticeable to us. that you may not notice it is one of those things i'd put down to "tastes vary".

yes, salt is required but added salt may not be. again, "tastes vary". *shrug* ;)
 

baymule

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My mother was a salt-a-phobic and had a stroke at 88. One of the effects of not enough salt in one's diet is stroke. It ruined her life, she gave up her home and moved in with us.
For me, I use Real Salt. I salt my food to taste. Sometimes I shake some in my hand and eat it, I guess that is my body saying that salt levels are low. I also use canning salt in my tomatoes.
Eh. To each their own.
 

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