Chainsaws

secuono

Garden Addicted
Joined
Jun 1, 2011
Messages
1,623
Reaction score
1,236
Points
287
Location
VA
I have a battery one, love it. Dewalt brand
Have cut down trees up to 10" thick so far.


Husband bought an expensive gas chainsaw 9yes ago. It froze up and became worthless fast, barely got any use if it. And no one sold the specialty tools to fix it, had to take to dealer or you were screwed. It was also heavy & super loud, I couldn't get used to it and use it safely.

I haven't seen any corded chainsaws, but then again, I only recently learned that there are push mowers that are on a cord. =0
I'd run over the cord or chop it off so fast...lol

We do have a corded, extension limb trimmer. Somewhat easy to use, but short cord and the company highly discouraged using any extension cords, no matter how heavy duty. =/
 
Last edited:

ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
6,487
Reaction score
3,834
Points
377
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
To each his/her own. I prefer the corded ones bc I never lose power and don't have to do a gasoline one. HOWEVER, TWC had a story of maybe 10 years ago, where some friends trailered their horses to a cabin in CO, and straight line winds knocked down pine trees prevented them from driving back. They were MANLY MEN, owned chainsaws and went to work clearing a path, so they didn't really have to get rescued. The ole gas powered was what they used.
 

secuono

Garden Addicted
Joined
Jun 1, 2011
Messages
1,623
Reaction score
1,236
Points
287
Location
VA
To each his/her own. I prefer the corded ones bc I never lose power and don't have to do a gasoline one. HOWEVER, TWC had a story of maybe 10 years ago, where some friends trailered their horses to a cabin in CO, and straight line winds knocked down pine trees prevented them from driving back. They were MANLY MEN, owned chainsaws and went to work clearing a path, so they didn't really have to get rescued. The ole gas powered was what they used.

Okay?
Why are you replying like that, as if I was talking to you or saying battery is best and somehow insulting your choice?
Are you trying to pick fights with me or is that always how you reply to others?
 

ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
6,487
Reaction score
3,834
Points
377
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
Gee, NEVER trying to insult. There are 3 ways to go:
1) gasoline powered
2) electric, with a cord
3) battery powered
It's just my personal preference.
Everybody has their own reasons for the tools that they buy.
I miswrote: I never have to make a gasoline RUN for my chainsaw.
I Certainly have to buy gas for:
1) push mowers
2) riding mower
3) tractor
We have to carefully label and store ALL of it. We also keep kerosene, and the tractor runs on diesel.
 
Last edited:

Lickbranchfarm

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 18, 2018
Messages
397
Reaction score
1,083
Points
187
Location
North Carolina Zone 8
Sorry im late to the party Ridge i just seen this...

Every thing Major said i agree on plus.....

The high speed jet is stopped up in your carb.

Most Carburetors have a low speed and high speed jet that allows fuel to pass through the carb, One is small, the other is a little bigger. As the throttle is increased, the demand for fuel is higher, bringing the second bigger jet into play (high speed) . the fact you can run it with the choke on means your forcing all the fuel through the low speed due to vacuum created by the choke plate. Probably take it off and blow everything out with compressed air, that usually does the trick. If not soak it in carb cleaner. The ethanol fuel used now days is awful on small engine carbs.
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
7,130
Reaction score
6,307
Points
377
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
Thanks @Lickbranchfarm another thing to try. That's why I like different opinions and different experiences.

I haven't started anything yet, plan to early next week. I figure I need to leave some time to do this, no tight schedule since these things always take longer than they should. My first step not done yet is to look for a U-tube on this specific carburetor if I can find one. That might help me avoid a surprise.
 

Dirtmechanic

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 14, 2019
Messages
474
Reaction score
743
Points
157
Location
Birmingham AL (Zone 8a)
Thanks @Lickbranchfarm another thing to try. That's why I like different opinions and different experiences.

I haven't started anything yet, plan to early next week. I figure I need to leave some time to do this, no tight schedule since these things always take longer than they should. My first step not done yet is to look for a U-tube on this specific carburetor if I can find one. That might help me avoid a surprise.
As many of those little carbs as I have rebuilt, I have learned a couple of tips that help. The most important tool I have is this welding tip file set:
10628836_fry_86120_pri_larg.jpg

Its a brilliant tool for cleaning those incredibly small passages in a carb.

I would bet your generator carb has a single speed (narrow range really) setup with a fuel bowl under the carb. It works on suction, venturi style. Basically a metal straw sticks up into the wind inside the shaped throat and the slight constriction increases velocity drawing out gas from the tube. Below this tube are a few things that can cause trouble, the main one is the small hole in the bowl nut that serve a fuel metering function. Cleaning those jet holes usually helps "lean" condition. You are getting too much air for the quantity of fuel getting pulled up. Very possibly corrosion. You have to watch out for a hole prior to the venturi that balances the gas lost from the bowl with replacement air. A simple design but important, because without the replacement air, a vacuum is created in the fuel bowl meaning gas will not want to come out easily if at all.

Those carbs are usually super simple. The fuel float works like a toilet tank float. The rubber ring around the bowl can leak air and the washer between the nut and bowl can go bad but thats obviously a gas leak and is easy to spot. They also do not necessarily use a high and low circuit, speed is controlled with a governor rather than a throttle.


Also I literally did the research on the 2 cycle gaskets re: the myth of alcohol. The makers say alcohol does not effect the black plasticky sheet parts. I never found that verbage about the cheesy cardboard gaskets so I am still looking. My suspicion is the crapola the cardboard seals are made of is the source of my real airleak\fuel problems. I have helped myself by imagining there is an actual torq spec out there in netland so I tighten the hell out of the screws upon reassembly and it seems to keep them running properly for longer.

And lastly, tuning should be a little rich for proper lubrication and lower heat. Well that, and 89 octane gas helps them run cooler too.

I have had my stihl equipment more than 20 years now. I did buy B a new hand held blower. I still have the old one though. I am finding the gas tanks are shrinking a little this far down the line, and the fuel line holes get weepy as a result.
 
Last edited:
Top