Ducks4you 2021 Ragtag Thread

Ridgerunner

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the small difference in elevation is signifigant.
It can be extremely significant and not just for houses. Put your chicken coop and run on higher ground. I hate to think of a pig pen where it stays wet. Put your outbuildings on higher ground. Think about drainage when positioning a garden, flower bed, or planting trees. It can make your life a lot easier.

Many years back in a different location we got about 16" of rain in about half a day. Over a day and a half the total as 24". 1" of elevation kept our house from flooding. We were one of two houses on the street that did not flood. I noticed how just a mall difference in elevation can make a big difference.
 

baymule

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We are at part of the highest elevation in our county, at 610 feet by the road, the house sits a little lower, A gully goes through our property and we put up swales to slow the run off. I also use tree trunks and branches in various places to combat erosion.

No way I would live in a flood zone!
 

ducks4you

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Marie2020

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Took the glass lid off of the tomato terrarium this afternoon. Cooking away like a sauna inside!
Here are some articles to help keep your fruit blossoms from freezing:
"You'd never dream that Christmas lights would give off enough heat to keep your plants from freezing, but they will. You can string them up and down your plants. This option works great for trees as well. Not only will you look festive on cold nights, but you'll also awake to plants that have been kept warm all night."
There's been many a house fire from Christmas lights. I haven't used them for years
 

ducks4you

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Checking on my beds after yet A N O T H E R!!!! downpour this morning.
I had buried 1/2 of last year's tomatoes that rotted there, and some of them volunteered.
I may have MANY more tomatoes this year than I thought I would have.
I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE volunteers!!!! :weee
They are always tougher than the plants you nurse along.
I even have a volunteer potato growing with my okra, bc I moved dirt there from my potato bed.
Guess I missed it. WHY bother pulling it out?!?!?
Funny, all of this rain hasn't rotted my potatoes. They are ALL sending up stems and leaves, and soon, flowers.
2nd try at asparagus. DD's said that theirs is doing ok. Don't know how often they look, and I haven't had Time to look. Mine are healthy, just need some more weeding and paper treatment. Maybe, in 2 years, I will have a small harvest. We'll see it they decide to spread.
Checked on my sweet corn. Most of it (2020 seeds) have sprouted and are LOVING all of the rain.
Probably bc the south side of my garage drains well, and they are growing in 6 years of rotting and dumped used stall bedding. They are, after all HEAVY feeders.
I have good drainage on all of my beds, except north of the garage, but I planted wax begonias and impatiens there and I think they Like the extra watering.
Found some cheapo boxed packages of sweet corn yesterday at Menard's, so they will get planted in the front of the others in the next few days.
Bought 4 packages, don't know how many, but we'll see.
Also bought 4 packages of pole beans.
REMEMBER, do NOT plant pole beans next to your sweet/indian corn.
The stalks are NOT strong enough to hold up to any vining.

When they are talking, "3 sisters planting", it means bush beans and any kind of squash, not necessary pumpkins.
 
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