Ducks4you for 2022

ducks4you

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Thanks! Not 100% yet, bc I feel like I am recovering from bronchitis, but I am getting things done. In the evening I fall asleep an hour early in my tv chair, while DH binges.
It's a little easier when he re watches stuff like "The Witcher" instead of "Yellostone."
 

ducks4you

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Waiting on my washer to start before a well needed shower. Stalls are done and prepped for tonight.
I didn't finish my grape vine post painting this fall, left them out against the tool shed, and I finally stored them in the carraige house this afternoon. It's an old building that has 2 x 4's that are for cross support, but they make a nice area to store fenceposts.
Emptied the tow wagon, pushed all of the way in, and drove my riding mower into it's winter position engine inside, with enough room to shut the garage door when necessary.
Pressure canning 2 quarts of dog chicken stock (from the chicken bones, etc., that I cooked again) and I have 4 pints of carrots in the canner with them, reckoned 35 minutes for all.
By the time I get out of the shower it will be time to move the canner off of the burner,
 
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ducks4you

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No, it's like Pinterest wrote a coffee table book about ranching, and Kevin Costner thought the book would make a good series.
Blech!!
We should put donkeys out with the cattle, (like That's a new idea.)
Let's invest millions in show horse studs that slide and spin, bc that's what you DO when you are trying to catch your cattle.
Let's go ride some buffalo!
Let's be really emo about your family.
Let's go drive the cattle for 2 days, but DON'T take tents or food or anything.

Bonanza was more relevant.
 

ducks4you

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On this Thread, I answered @seedcorn.
37 years later NOBODY asks ME if I am tired of horsekeeping.
I do ALL of the horse chores, easier with them in the back yard.
I have to consider where I dump from the stalls every winter.
THIS year, I am digging up a limited number weeds trying to be perennials (that didn't just pull out of the ground) that are growing where I dumped last year and I am dumping in the same places. This is the Best time of year to do this. Ground isn't frozen yet and you can tease them out by their roots with a shovel. There is only one that I couldn't get out, just under a fenceline, so it can get poisoned next year.
In 2023 I will be using my tiller then tractor to move last year's used bedding mixed with this winter's used bedding and improve my garden beds.
I do a LOT of burning on my property and the ashes have their own places, always moved when dead cold.
Weeds, which are hollow, burn very well.
I have stopped using pine shavings for my fire starters, and, instead, I am making them with candles on a candlewarmer that have wicks too short to burn and using lint from the dryer. Free and free, along with free cardboard egg cartons.
 

seedcorn

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Once you are infected with a disease, you always are. Dairy people and horse people are beyond hope. No one would take a job where it is 2X a day, every day for the rest of your life.....:frow
 

ducks4you

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Not that hard. 6 months out of the year they are on pasture, Every day in the nice weather I feed them grain in buckets under the fence and count noses, and I keep the water tank full.
THIS is the most labor intensive time of year and I put them in stalls at night to dry their feet out in our very wet winter weather.
Now, DAIRY farming...you can Never not milk them.
 
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