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Elevated bed for herbs

Discussion in 'Herbs' started by hoodat, Aug 15, 2019.

  1. Aug 15, 2019
    hoodat

    hoodat Garden Addicted

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    I no longer have a place to raise vegetables and probably wouldn't be physically able. I can still get down but it's Hell to get back up, but I have a strong urge to grow something. Even a weed would be welcome at this point. :(
    I was thinking of an elevated bed; sort of a table with sides that can be filled with potting soil. It would have to be somewhere around 6 x3 feet or less since our patios are quite small. That would let me grow a few herbs.
    In this dry heat here in the desert it would probably need to be watered several times a day and the herbs would have to be heat and drought resistant. Suggestions?
     
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  2. Aug 15, 2019
    catjac1975

    catjac1975 Garden Master

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    You may have noticed we lost NYBoy this past winter. He went home with the flu from work and the was the last we heard from him, A member found out he had passed so young. Another member to be missed.
     
  3. Aug 15, 2019
    Rhodie Ranch

    Rhodie Ranch Garden Master

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    whatever you decide to finagle/configure, please do a plastic trash can liner surrounding the bottom. This will help to retain a tiny bit of the moisture you'll be adding due to your desert heat.

    I would start with basil, but use the Thai basil. That way you can snip a few leaves when you go to dinner to add flavor to the bland offerings. Also I would plant fennel - I love the tall blooms it makes and it can take alot of abuse. Then cut the flowers and bring them into your abode for wonder scent. Also plant some chives. They can shrivel and then bounce back. Again, snip one or two for each boring meal they serve you.
     
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  4. Aug 15, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    A friend built three such tables so they could stand and garden. Theirs are 4'x6' x12". They grow a lot of vegetables in them.

    Lavender is drought tolerant and can be used in a lot of dishes, or just clip and rub on your hands.
     
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  5. Aug 16, 2019
    hoodat

    hoodat Garden Addicted

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    Good idea on the lavender. I don't know if there are ay beeks around here but if I grow Spanish lavender I can find out. Bees really swarm Spanish lavender even though they pretty much ignore English lavender.
    I have a south facing picture window in my room so I can probably put down a plastic tray and grow larger plants in pots inside where I can have better control over temperature and humidity.
     
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  6. Aug 16, 2019
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    I have very little experience in growing herbs in containers, especially in hot dry conditions like I imagine you'd have outside. For your outside area I'd probably think of annuals, it may be challenging to keep perennials alive year round. Inside with AC perennials maybe be easier. But do as you choose. You've been at this longer than I have.

    Thai basil and chives were on my list too. Italian basil probably gets too big unless you really cut it back. Coriander (cilantro) and dill might be interesting. Parsley has a nice flavor with a lot of different things. I find with all these if you keep them cut back and don't let them flower or go to seed they tend to last a while, but I don't grow them in containers.

    You might consider mint or maybe lemon balm. Both can be petty tough.
     
  7. Aug 16, 2019
    hoodat

    hoodat Garden Addicted

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    If I decide on chives they will probably be garlic chives. They have a flavor somewhere between regular chives and garlic. In my San Diego garden they died off without water but came back with the first rain. They multiply by clumping so you only have to plant them once. They have very pretty flowers and also produce many seeds. A medicinal tea that helps control blood pressure can be made from either leaves or seeds.
    Thai or temple basil is a good suggestion I like the hint of licorice in their taste. Very good for salads.
     
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  8. Aug 16, 2019
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    People talk about how good garlic scapes are in a salad. I think chives scapes do pretty well.
     
  9. Aug 16, 2019
    catjac1975

    catjac1975 Garden Master

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    Boy Hoodat. I have missed your thorough expertise on all things garden. One think is very clear. Your body may be giving you some trouble but your mind is as sharp as I remember..
     
  10. Aug 16, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    Sounds Great!! You can have one made that allows you to sit and dabble. The easiest herbs to grow are oregano and mint. There are MANY different varieties of mint, and my chocolate mint REALLY smells like chocolate mint.
    You could plant these two invasive herbs in closed pots somewhere in a sea of dirt for your other herbs and they will not spread, unless you let them go to seed.
    Lavender is nice, too, but it doesn't like to get it's feet wet and will fail if overwatered. I know...
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2019

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