Feeding: Broccoli pumpkin, blueberrries and herbs

Marie2020

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I. want to see a picture of the entire bed from a distance. Otherwise I don't believe it, haha.

Mary
I keep looking because I can't believe it after so long waiting

Broccoli taking it's time

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Pumpkin just starting to grow

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Raised bed closed

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Marie2020

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Coconut coir.

Will a little of this be ok in my raised bed as an extra nutrient or will it mess up the bugs that's needed?

I've read that a little is good for the blue berries. I would like too add some to my baby lavender that has been planted in my garden

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Then of course i have cucumbers that are still potted.

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digitS'

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I thought that it was peat moss with its low pH that was advisable for blueberries ...

This is really "off the top of my head," or to put it more clearly, guessing. I have neither grown blueberries nor used coconut coir but, here goes ;).

I have read others' opinions on coir that it carries salts. There are salt-tolerant plants that may do better in it. Additionally, that coir has a pH close to neutral which makes it less desirable for acid-loving plants.

The important idea behind both coir and peat moss is that they do not decompose easily. So, we shouldn't really look to them for the purpose of feeding the microorganisms or the plants.

Steve
who is just a longtime gardener and ain't no horticulturalist or biologist.
 

Marie2020

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I thought that it was peat moss with its low pH that was advisable for blueberries ...

This is really "off the top of my head," or to put it more clearly, guessing. I have neither grown blueberries nor used coconut coir but, here goes ;).

I have read others' opinions on coir that it carries salts. There are salt-tolerant plants that may do better in it. Additionally, that coir has a pH close to neutral which makes it less desirable for acid-loving plants.

The important idea behind both coir and peat moss is that they do not decompose easily. So, we shouldn't really look to them for the purpose of feeding the microorganisms or the plants.

Steve
who is just a longtime gardener and ain't no horticulturalist or biologist.
I just ordered Limonium plants they are usually growing near the sea. Maybe I can use this coir on these. As they have a salt tolerance. 🤞.

I have 10 kilos of this I must find a use for it somehow

Thanks a lot Steve. I could have completely destroyed all I've worked for here. Google has not been too clever on this information.

You know a heck of a lot more than me. :thumbsup
 

flowerbug

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lavender will be fine in more rocky and harder soils as long as it is perched a bit so it doesn't get waterlogged. remember it is a mediteranean plant which can handle dryer weather (once it is established).

we have gobs of lavender planted here and even in areas that flood once in a while but the plants themselves are put up a bit so they are not primarily down where it floods. the soil underneath is topsoil and sand so they are actually drained well once the flash flood moment is over. in other spots they are a foot or two above grade and we never water them (not even during the droughts we've had) and they usually bloom up a storm every year. i can't ever recall a year where they've not bloomed.
 

Marie2020

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lavender will be fine in more rocky and harder soils as long as it is perched a bit so it doesn't get waterlogged. remember it is a mediteranean plant which can handle dryer weather (once it is established).

we have gobs of lavender planted here and even in areas that flood once in a while but the plants themselves are put up a bit so they are not primarily down where it floods. the soil underneath is topsoil and sand so they are actually drained well once the flash flood moment is over. in other spots they are a foot or two above grade and we never water them (not even during the droughts we've had) and they usually bloom up a storm every year. i can't ever recall a year where they've not bloomed.
Thanks mr flowerbug. ;) .

Now I have one plant that I can use this coir on at least :)
 

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