Flowers at home.

aftermidnight

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@sumi
I grow a pole bean (Irish Conners) that originally came from your country. here's they information I have on it.
Ken Conners was born on Ireland in 1898. His family immigrated to Boston Massachusetts in 1900, and then again moved to New Brunswick, Canada in 1907. They made their way out west and settled in the Vancouver B.C. area. The family is still around, but in the interior of B.C. now where they run an antique store and still to this day grow this bean that followed them around their journey in North America. The color of these beans, while not the crazy spray of colors like some varieties is a rich chestnut-brown when thoroughly dry. Moderately large plants (Approx. 6 ft.) White flowers, pods are 7-8" long with 6-8 beans per pod, usually 3 pods per shoot. Good either as a snap or dried. Doesn't like high heat, does better in moderate temperatures. Early producer, ready for drying stage in only about 70-80 days.
A couple of pictures...
Bean* Irish Conners.jpg DSCN4515.JPG
Snap bean stage...........Freshly harvested seed,
Maybe it's still being sold in Ireland today under another name?.... or is it another bean almost lost but for a few seed savers.

Annette
 

sumi

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@sumi
I grow a pole bean (Irish Conners) that originally came from your country. here's they information I have on it.
Ken Conners was born on Ireland in 1898. His family immigrated to Boston Massachusetts in 1900, and then again moved to New Brunswick, Canada in 1907. They made their way out west and settled in the Vancouver B.C. area. The family is still around, but in the interior of B.C. now where they run an antique store and still to this day grow this bean that followed them around their journey in North America. The color of these beans, while not the crazy spray of colors like some varieties is a rich chestnut-brown when thoroughly dry. Moderately large plants (Approx. 6 ft.) White flowers, pods are 7-8" long with 6-8 beans per pod, usually 3 pods per shoot. Good either as a snap or dried. Doesn't like high heat, does better in moderate temperatures. Early producer, ready for drying stage in only about 70-80 days.
A couple of pictures...
View attachment 17833 View attachment 17834
Snap bean stage...........Freshly harvested seed,
Maybe it's still being sold in Ireland today under another name?.... or is it another bean almost lost but for a few seed savers.

Annette
This is very interesting, thank you for sharing and the tag. In spring the stores here restock their seeds and I will go have a browse and see if I can find anything that matches this description.
 

Carol Dee

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YES, I put NINE identical coins in the red purse in hopes that he had the cactus and it is flowering. If not I will send him one when weather warms.
 

Larisa

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Yes, Christmas cactus blooms forever. This works even for my children, who do not care for him. My younger son gets two chocolate from a vending machine instead of one.:)
 

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