Garden humor thread..

digitS'

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Pulsegleaner

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Peas: I am a legume. I will survive 15 degrees and only lose 1 (one) pod. :] You can count on me!

Peanuts: I am a legume. I was domesticated in an extremely hot area. One flash of 25 degrees out can kill me. I am so sorry.
Actually, the area peanuts are from isn't all that hot, it's in the Andes. It just isn't all that COLD either, the Andes are one of those weird places where latitude, longitude and altitude combine to make environments were it is cool but not freezing year round. That the peanut could adapt to other places in the world is nothing short of a miracle.
 

Zeedman

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Actually, the area peanuts are from isn't all that hot, it's in the Andes. It just isn't all that COLD either, the Andes are one of those weird places where latitude, longitude and altitude combine to make environments were it is cool but not freezing year round. That the peanut could adapt to other places in the world is nothing short of a miracle.
And as a friend found out who just returned from time spent in the Andes, those cooler temperatures can be deceptive... because in the tropical higher altitudes, the UV is really high. She came back with really severe facial sunburn.
 

Pulsegleaner

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And as a friend found out who just returned from time spent in the Andes, those cooler temperatures can be deceptive... because in the tropical higher altitudes, the UV is really high. She came back with really severe facial sunburn.
Hmm, I wonder if THAT is why all of those Native Andeans begin to get super wrinkly once they get old (those deep, tight wrinkles all over, as opposed to the looser ones we normally get). Granted, after untold thousands of years living there, they have probably adapted to the extra UV (the same way they have developed bigger lungs and more efficient oxygen absorption to deal with the thinner air,) but it still probably takes a toll eventually.
 

flowerbug

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Hmm, I wonder if THAT is why all of those Native Andeans begin to get super wrinkly once they get old (those deep, tight wrinkles all over, as opposed to the looser ones we normally get). Granted, after untold thousands of years living there, they have probably adapted to the extra UV (the same way they have developed bigger lungs and more efficient oxygen absorption to deal with the thinner air,) but it still probably takes a toll eventually.

they wear hats. colorful and interesting hats.
 

Pulsegleaner

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they wear hats. colorful and interesting hats.
They do, but hat's are far better at protecting the top of your head than your face. They may give you shade so the sun doesn't blind your eyes, but as for protecting the skin of your face from any sunlight that reflects onto it, hats don't help much.

Of course, there's a genetic component as well, since non-mountain people of Native American descent also tend to get those wrinkles with age (as do many Asians, who would be the Native Americans distant ancestor relatives.) It's probably just an ethnic trait.
 

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