ducks4you

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 4, 2009
Messages
11,204
Reaction score
13,939
Points
417
Location
East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
I'm concerned about buying insects. The first year I grew in what is now my 55' x 65' horse training area, now fenced in as of 2008, so my garden moved 25' SW. I grew squashes, melons, TONS of cucumbers and zucchini. I had 40 cucumber plants and was throwing huge cucumbers to the horses just to get rid of the excess.
NOW, every year I fight squash bugs and squash vine borers and have to start my squashes and melons in July, just to avoid them. I understand that you can bring them home by buying plants from gardening centers, like the ones attached to grocery stores, where they hire just anybody to care for them. I'm sure that I infected my garden. sigh..........
I'm starting everything this year from seed to try and clean things up--THAT is my big 2017 garden plan. I also understand that I can spray diluted Dawn (1 teaspoon/gallon of water) to the leaves to help eradicate them. I have heard that it dries out the exoskeleton and doesn't have the gross effects of chemical poisons.
ALSO, I'm reveling over the warm up and rain this week, bc I will dig out my "salad garden" tomorrow when I'm home, and will cover and start building up my cold frame so that I can start things a good month early outside. I have always wanted a good cold frame. The salad garden cold frame will have level windows instead of sloped, but that won't matter, since it is a crude first attempt for me AND the wood on this raised bed is starting to rot out and needs to be replaced next year anyway.
If this works I'm going to start on the south side of my garage to build a permanent, small green house There. That bed used to have 8 yews. They were overgrown and I chopped them down and dug out the roots some 7 years ago. It has had no good purpose since. The two black raspberry bushes are overgrown and I never seem to get a good crop from them, so they gotta go. Burning :somadis our country pastime!!!
I found clearance 36-cell starter "greenhouses" at WM for $1.00/each w/starter soil, so I bought 7 of them yesterday and 6 pretty red heavy plastic pots for $.10/each. Good winter finds! I have an indoor, metal frame "greenhouse" with a plastic cover and 4 shelves to set up by the weekend in my office on the 2nd floor. We have dormers in our 100yo home with what we dubbed "suicide windows", bc they start at floor level, great for houseplants and for cold weather starts. I'm going to try my hand at micro-greens. I was going to start some herbs, but not everything. I had a great basil harvest and put up about 8 quarts of dehydrated basil, so I don't need to grow that. I just bought a rosemary--jealous of @ninnymary bc she can keep that as a perennial, but it's too cold here, so houseplant to garden for me. If I find some thyme I'll keep that going this winter, too. I need to find a better outside place for thyme. All of my efforts failed for thyme in the past.
IF I have time (thyme...pun :lol:), I would love to fix my herb garden. I can use the sage which spreads slowly and certainly it is overrun with oregano, but I need to get more useable herbs planted. I'm thinking about using bricks and subdividing it, since I have a brick border surrounding it and I've been buying and collecting clearance bricks from the hardstore over the years--no new purchases. It's a low priority, but I am encouraged by the BIG job I did to fix the pond in front of my horse shelter. You can get great confidence solving a problem where NOBODY has published plans or can give you ANY advice.
 

ninnymary

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Messages
12,566
Reaction score
12,379
Points
437
Location
San Francisco East Bay
ducks, I love the idea of separating your herbs with a brick pattern. It would look very English, which I love and hopefully you do to. My thyme and rosemary stay evergreen year round. This is nice since my son uses thyme in dishes a lot. I think I have room for a couple more plants of it. So easy to grow.

Those are great deals you got at WM. WM is not that close to me and the employees attitudes there are terrible so I don't like going there.

Sounds like you have a lot of work ahead of you. Start with the small projects first so that you get encouraged to keep going.

Mary
 

digitS'

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
25,774
Reaction score
28,914
Points
457
Location
border, ID/WA(!)
Here is an idea that fits somewhat with my notion that herbs are for fun and that hardscape isn't the most important part of a garden; it's important job is to help the gardener move around. The idea doesn't fit too well in my small, rectangular lot, however. That's where the perennials have to stay.

It was a long time ago and probably in a gardening magazine. There was a picture of a circular herb garden with randomly placed stepping stones. I'm fairly tall but any bed wider than 4' is just too wide. I can't comfortably reach in 3 feet or even 30 inches. And yet, a 4' circle is a tiny thing as an herb garden.

How about Random Stepping Stones? How would that work and how would placement not look contrived. So as not to simply waste space, the steps would need to be placed with human comfort in mind.

Well, how about preparing the bed, lovely soil, nice and smoothly raked - then, just step in there? After tramping over the center part of the bed, step out and begin dropping a stone in every footprint.

I even had what I thought would be a cute, additional idea: build a form in the shape of a giant footprint, and use concrete from those forms for the stepping stones ;).

Steve
 

Beekissed

Garden Master
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
5,054
Reaction score
6,797
Points
377
Location
Eastern Panhandle, WV
Ooooh, tools! I love talking tools, whatcha getting?

I want to get one of these. This would be perfect to scuffle through the wood chips to cut off weeds under the surface of the chips. My traditional hoe is like using a club in wood chips, as it doesn't slice into wood chips like it does into soil. Rakes are not effective either...I want this handy slicer hoe.

ScuffleHoe.jpg


Used for both pushing and for pulling the Rogue Scuffle Hoe 60S has it all going on! In fact, one customer claims that he can “out-weed a tiller” with this scuffle hoe. It allows for hoeing without the back-breaking bending. The head is hand-honed, on each side, to a superior, beveled, sharp edge to make short work of weeding your garden. This Rogue triangle hoe has a 60-inch northern white ash handle for strength and longevity. If you have never tried a scuffle hoe, now is the time!
 

ChickenGrass

Garden Ornament
Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
69
Reaction score
69
Points
77
Location
Republic of Ireland
This year I am planting
Cabbage , parsnips, carrots, swede, corn, spinach, beetroot, Runner beans, broad beans, melon, peppers, peas, tomatoes, cauliflower, strawberries and lettuce.
This year I am hoping the carrots and parsnips,
Grow straight and not fork like the always do :D
I would also now like to add
Kohl rabi
Leeks
Spring onions
Chili
celery
And cucumbers
 

Latest posts

Top