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Help! Newly planted tree wilting a bit

Discussion in 'Trees & Shrubs' started by Andrew, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. Jul 16, 2017
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Yay!
     
  2. Aug 17, 2017
    Karen Reck

    Karen Reck Leafing Out

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    Adjusting to a new home is stressful for young trees. The same thing happened to me after taking a black walnut tree in my backyard from my grandparent's home. I gently placed it in a planting spot, sealed with soil and quenched with water and I couldn't wait for my new tree to flourish. But after weeks of watching my tree soak in its brand new life, I could see only wilted leaves. The sudden change in environment can lead to all sorts problem, which is transplant shock. They usually start at the tree's root. Sometimes roots don't have enough space to spread out or get enough water right after being planted. I think in your case this is what happened. Whatever the case, trees wear their heart on sleeves-or should we say as their leaves. That's why you see those wilted leaves.
    Trees often suffer from transplant shock because their roots don't have enough space to establish themselves. So here are a few things you can try:

    1) Don’t over prune young trees, unless it’s to remove dead or damaged branches.
    2) Give tree roots at least 1 inch of water per week.
    3) Apply a two to four-inch deep layer of mulch from the base of the tree to the drip line. Keep mulch five inches away from the trunk.

    If these tips don't seem to work, consider replanting the tree in a larger hole. If you're unsure about this, seek the help of an arborist.
     
    Nyboy likes this.

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