Hi from New Zealand

digitS'

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Considering that quite a few people moved away ... ;). Well, this area has had continuous growth over the last 50 years but I checked. Yes, the 80's population increase was the smallest at this particular spot on the border.

Other than the people apprehensively looking over their shoulders for several years ...

Grain production improved once the ash could be turned under. Sulfur is generally a good soil addition, locally.

Steve
 

YourRabbitGirl

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Hi, I live in the South Waikato, New Zealand.
I restarted my gardening a number of years ago with a Permaculture garden a la Linda woodrow with a dome chicken tractor which made me round beds to plant into.
That went well for the first 18 months but I started running into problems with it. In hindsight, i should have made the dome smaller. that would have made it more manageable.

After struggling with it, I locked the hens up in their own foraging section....or tried to, they always managed to get out, much to the amusement of my elderly neighbours, who delighted in watching them fly onto the top of my fence, walk along it and hop down the other side, where they hid all their eggs.

When I became aware of the need to also provide habitat and forage for native species, I started cycling out plants that were not herb, vege, fruit or beneficial insect plants, in favour of native plants/trees.

I also started concentrating on permanent plants and fruit trees and have almost run out of places to put these and still have room to grow vegetables.

Three years ago, I decided to add honey bees to the mix and have managed to keep these alive, sometimes by the skin of their teeth. So far this year they are looking good going into winter.....

This year, I decided to let go some of my work commitments and have been trying to get things back under control, starting from the front yard to keep my neat and tidy neighbours placated and working my way up the back.

I'm currently paving a sloped path from my courtyard up to the back lawn so I no longer have to haul the lawn mower up round 5 curved steps. Just got the last 5 meters of the flat section to go.

I have always thought of it as a work in progress and every little change makes it that much enjoyable.
Welcome. I really admire people who are gardening in an icy location... I know its difficult but you guys make it look so easy. Kudos to you and again... Welcome!!
 

Trish Stretton

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I'm not really sure how to answer you.
Right now, I'm in mid summer. Two days ago I did get the thermometer out to see how hot it was, but it was only 24C.
Today was much hotter, I hid inside and never checked the temps.
Our temperatures here are definitely not as extreme as alot of northern hemisphere countries.
Maybe I should start recording exactly what they are so I can be sure. I think I will, but right now, trust me, its not icy at all.
 

flowerbug

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yes, you are closer to @YourRabbitGirl than we are up here in the north countries. :) hope you are enjoying it even if hiding inside from the heat!

what fruits are you picking? any veggies ready? beans, any beans? *wink*
 

Trish Stretton

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I'm eating plums- Hawera which is a seedling of the Black Doris. Couldnt find Black Doris after a couple of years of looking, but I might be able to get some cuttings from somebody next winter to try to graft them onto my tree.
Rocket and lettuce....yum

My first cucumber is almost ready- its an India Indian heirloom type. Zuchinni's have been going great guns and my peas have recovered from my grandson's exuberance. (I still only have the one bed in production, but watch this space)

Sweet corn is soooo close but not quite yet and I have been eyeing up the beetroot too.
Sorry, the only beans I have going at the moment are the Great White Northerns that pipimac gave me and my Cannelinni but both are for drying,not eating green.

I check the Asparagus every day, hoping there might be another stalk, you never know. It doesnt make it to the kitchen, me and Jack have been snacking on it in the garden.
 

flowerbug

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I'm eating plums- Hawera which is a seedling of the Black Doris. Couldnt find Black Doris after a couple of years of looking, but I might be able to get some cuttings from somebody next winter to try to graft them onto my tree.
Rocket and lettuce....yum

My first cucumber is almost ready- its an India Indian heirloom type. Zuchinni's have been going great guns and my peas have recovered from my grandson's exuberance. (I still only have the one bed in production, but watch this space)

Sweet corn is soooo close but not quite yet and I have been eyeing up the beetroot too.
Sorry, the only beans I have going at the moment are the Great White Northerns that pipimac gave me and my Cannelinni but both are for drying,not eating green.

I check the Asparagus every day, hoping there might be another stalk, you never know. It doesnt make it to the kitchen, me and Jack have been snacking on it in the garden.
you have to leave some of the stalks alone so the plant has energy to keep growing! i've never heard of any dog being interested in eating asparagus. :)
 

digitS'

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Zuchinni's have been going great guns and my peas ...
I was just reading a recipe for Zucchini and Pea soup. I thought: split pea soup? No, it was for fresh peas.

I don't live where spring-planted peas are likely to survive until there is zucchini available to harvest. A sowing for fall has enough time for using the tendrils or having a few pods or shell peas from vines that can make only a limited growth in the heat and then, Autumn chill

You could try that soup, Trish. You could also try it substituting another type of squash for the zucchini, as I was thinking of doing. Of course, I could freeze some peas and try that, as well. (I may try a salmon chowder soon, using pumpkins from storage as an ingredient :).)

Steve
 

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