International Migratory Bird Day

flowerbug

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i did get a picture, tried a few times, didn't like how the first batch of pictures came out the second batch i tried something different, worse, so perhaps tomorrow i'll sit out there for a break with the camera and umbrella and a comfy chair and be close enough that perhaps i can get a better picture. the one i have now is ok, but not as clear as it would be nice to have. pretty birds. it was watching me take pictures of itself as it was wondering what i was doing and if i was dangerous or something. no i'm not dangerous to nice little birdies like that one. i hope they come back next year to nest again. perhaps they also eat all the hornets or other bees that live inside that pot belly stove. :)
 

Ridgerunner

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My sister-in-law has an app on her phone where she records bird songs and it tells her what bird it is. I don't know what it's called but with your expertise you should be able to find it. She demonstrated it last week with a white eyed vireo and a prothonotary warbler. I was impressed with how well it picked out even a faint song.
 

digitS'

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Identifying small birds can really be difficult. Little Brown Jobs, LBJ's as Lady Bird Johnson and others have called them :D.

It may be more than ironic that we saw a Flycatcher on that recent trip to the garden. I had just read a somewhat silly story in the local weekly newspaper LINK. The story was about "citizen scientists" trying to identify flycatchers as separate species with almost nothing separating them in appearance and only songs as distinguishing one from the other.

Well, that leaves me out. But, what I am wondering is if this "Cordilleran" Flycatcher is an expanding population and becoming more commonly seen. Honestly, I think the garden visitor was a different species in the group. I didn't notice any "yellowish underparts" but who knows what it was?. And, it's been decades since I kept a list of species seen (or, imagined ;)). That ended when I lost my then bird ID book and list on an expedition and had to buy a new one. All very much pre-internet ...

Steve
 

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