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Mauldintigers 2016 Garden

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by Mauldintiger, Jul 6, 2016.

  1. Jul 8, 2016
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    We live close to a horse event center. Last fall we made many, many trips with an 8 yard dump trailer. The garden got somewhere in the neighborhood of 7 loads of pine shavings. That's my husband on the left, our neighbor on the right. We hauled loads for us and loads for him!

    IMG2614.jpg

    Then we put a fence around it.

    IMG2655.jpg

    And put 3 pigs in it.

    IMG2713.jpg

    The pigs rooted up roots and briars all winter, pooped all over the place and grew to slaughter weight. They went to freezer camp and I drove the tractor around and around with the disc, filling in the holes they left.

    All this helped tremendously, but I still have a long ways to go! I am building compost piles and next spring, I will dig a trench, fill with compost, then plant. Over time, I will build some good gardening ground.

    There is a power line contractor company around here, cleaning right of way. They just brought us a second load of wood chips mixed with green leaves. The green is heating up and will help compost the piles. I'll scoop horse poop with the tractor and layer poop and chips for some awesome compost.
     
    Larisa and Nyboy like this.
  2. Jul 9, 2016
    Mauldintiger

    Mauldintiger Deeply Rooted

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    Thursday and Friday harvest, I can't seem to stay on top of the okra, my variety is "Cajun Jewel", only gets about 5' tall. Only about 1/3 of my plants are producing right now because I had poor germination from the first planting. With 2 30' rows, I've got to figure out the best way to preserve it. Any ideas?
    The green onions are Egyptian walking onions and I have no idea what kind of eggplant that is. I planted "Rosita" from Southern Exposure and its purple.
    The green squash is Tatume from Mexico and will be a staple for me, great on the grill or in a casserole with eggs and cheese.

    image.jpeg image.jpeg
     
    Larisa, journey11 and baymule like this.
  3. Jul 9, 2016
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    I grew Applegreen eggplant for several years, MauldinTiger.

    That's what it looks like, aaand ..

    . Southern Exposure sells that variety, also.

    Steve ;)
     
  4. Jul 10, 2016
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    Chop the okra like you would for frying. That is, if that is the way that you eat it. Spread it over a cookie sheet and put in the oven at 350 degrees. I don't remember how many minutes, but don't walk away, keep an eye on it. Take it out when heated through, it will be a little steamy. Bag up and freeze it. I prefer this way of blanching to trying to blanch it in water--it gets slimy.

    You can fry it or put in soup or gumbo. I let it completely thaw out, season it and cornmeal it. The cornmeal sticks better on the blanched/frozen okra than on fresh okra.
     
  5. Jul 10, 2016
    Mauldintiger

    Mauldintiger Deeply Rooted

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    image.jpeg
    Dug about 50lbs of potatoes from my March planting. 35 lbs planted and I previously harvested about 30 lbs. So, 80 lbs. total, gives about a 21/2:1 lb. planted return. I've heard that 4-5 lbs harvest to 1 lb planted was average, so I guess I'm disappointed. More research on southern varieties is required.
    Red Norlund, Red Pontiac, Purple Viking and Satina from Maine Potato Lady. @majorcatfish got any ideas. Do you plant taters?
     
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  6. Jul 10, 2016
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    My best-looking potato plants are Red LaSoda. If I remember correctly, that is a UofFlorida release although, it's said to do well in the Southwest.

    This is neither Florida nor the Southwest but I'm not given to paying the high cost of shipping spuds. So, I hit some likely sales venues and usually take some of what is offered. I'd begun to have the feeling that potatoes are quite location-specific but maybe not! This might have payed off this time.

    Your Purple Vikings have done the best for me MauldinTiger. Still, this is about midway between Idaho's farms and #2Washington's potato growing area. It doesn't compare so well to either. I can get 20#/1# yield on a very good year. This won't be one of them.

    Steve
     
  7. Jul 10, 2016
    Mauldintiger

    Mauldintiger Deeply Rooted

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    I think red Norlund and Purple Vikng did best for me, red Pontiac had the lowest yield.
    And, 20 lbs for every lb planted, WOW!
     
  8. Jul 11, 2016
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    I think your potato harvest looks great. At least you doubled the amount planted.

    Mary
     
  9. Jul 13, 2016
    Mauldintiger

    Mauldintiger Deeply Rooted

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg
    Couple of pics from the garden this week. It's 65'x40', no till and organic, heavy mulch. I use grass clippings, straw, leaves, and coffee grounds from a local shop. I trade her produce in season for pure grounds with no filters.
    I have 6 trellis made from cattle panels and tposts, 32'' long by 61/2' high.
    This is my third year doing it this way, fewer pests and better production every year.
     
    Larisa, baymule, journey11 and 2 others like this.
  10. Jul 13, 2016
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    That is a very handsome garden Mauldintiger.
     

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