Recycled Items for Gardening Purposes

meadow

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What is your thought on soaking pea seeds overnight? I get opposing viewpoints online.
Definitely NOT overnight.

I do pre-soak, but only long enough for the seed to swell. It really speeds up the germination process. After soaking, seeds either get placed between moist paper towels (they must not be soggy) or my more favored approach is to put them in a shallow strainer tray within a larger solid tray (sets intended for sprouting seeds are often sold in Asian markets). Give them a good rinse a couple of times a day (I cover with water, let it soak for a minute or two, and then rinse). Keep them covered and dark and as soon as you see the little tail, pop them into the ground (or a pot, if needing to hold them over).

But that is what I do for beans and peas. I don't know anything about sweet peas.

I also put a piece of chicken wire over newly planted beds to keep the birds and squirrels away. Nothing fancy, just a scrap piece with enough arch bent into it to keep it off the ground and allow the plants to get started underneath it. Peacocks are very fond of young squash leaves. :(
 

digitS'

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I may try those shortened bottles, @Phaedra . I'm not sure what to use, tho. Our smaller milk bottles are not clear. DW's water bottles would certainly be too small a diameter for most things.

Berry boxes have come more into use in recent years but I wish there weren't so many holes in them. Top and bottom ... I've been trying them inside plastic bags and will move the film to the bottom when the top is cut off for use as a tray beneath the box. Leaving any seedlings that emerge with a cover isn't likely to happen for more than a couple of nights. They don't sit in the sun with a lid, except in the berry boxes.

Don't care much for the cookie boxes with a sloping bottom - the soil isn't deep enough in that area of the box. Too large of a box can be difficult to move around without a tray beneath it because of the thin plastic and weight of wet soil makes it easy for the soil to shift and disturb tiny seedlings. Yes, I have bought boxes just as I have wanted them at the bakery counter. It has never been a problem to do so at different stores. If your favorite pastry doesn't come in the "right" box, ask. Strudel bits and sandwich boxes are favorites ;).

Steve
BTW peas and beans are among the very few plants that i don't transplant to the garden. the soil always seems wet enough for them to germinate easily ... but yes, they may fall prey to the critters
 

ducks4you

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I have a stash of chicken wire! See how I outfoxed my kittens, below! Last time I planted here in this north facing basement window the soil and plants were sitting on the floor within a few days. My geraniums should survive here until May. I don't care about feeding the birds this Spring!
2022 Geraniums, 02-07-23, #6.jpg
 

Branching Out

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I am trying to use up some tea that I bought, and was a bit cranky over the fact that the tea bags are made of strong mesh fabric and are not compostable. Then I got to thinking about what someone said about bagging bean flowers to prevent cross pollination, and I made me rethink these little tulle bags. They are really sturdy, and they definitely could be slipped over a small blossom. I was able to cut a slit in the fabric to remove the spent tea leaves, and then the tea bag rinsed clean very easily. For now I will save them to see if an opportunity arises for making use of them.
 

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Branching Out

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Went for a walk in the neighbourhood on recycling day and came home with these bright and cheery silicone containers. I had no idea what they were, but it turns out they 'pop up' to form containers, or can be pressed down to store flat. There are six different sizes that nest together when flat. I still can't believe someone was tossing these out. So far they are great trays for starting tomatoes! 🍅
 

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Phaedra

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I may try those shortened bottles, @Phaedra . I'm not sure what to use, tho. Our smaller milk bottles are not clear. DW's water bottles would certainly be too small a diameter for most things.

Berry boxes have come more into use in recent years but I wish there weren't so many holes in them. Top and bottom ... I've been trying them inside plastic bags and will move the film to the bottom when the top is cut off for use as a tray beneath the box. Leaving any seedlings that emerge with a cover isn't likely to happen for more than a couple of nights. They don't sit in the sun with a lid, except in the berry boxes.

Don't care much for the cookie boxes with a sloping bottom - the soil isn't deep enough in that area of the box. Too large of a box can be difficult to move around without a tray beneath it because of the thin plastic and weight of wet soil makes it easy for the soil to shift and disturb tiny seedlings. Yes, I have bought boxes just as I have wanted them at the bakery counter. It has never been a problem to do so at different stores. If your favorite pastry doesn't come in the "right" box, ask. Strudel bits and sandwich boxes are favorites ;).

Steve
BTW peas and beans are among the very few plants that i don't transplant to the garden. the soil always seems wet enough for them to germinate easily ... but yes, they may fall prey to the critters
Hi Steve, i used most of the berries or grape boxes for microgreens, and they perform well so far, especially when you put them upside down.

P_20230213_074945.jpg


They are pretty suitable for germinating seeds as they have at least four ventilation holes. Here we have labels on the top, so I use top as the planting tray. No matter for microgreens or seeds to sprout, the shallow tops are sufficient.
P_20230213_075001.jpg


I am thinking how to assemble them further. ✌️
 

Branching Out

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It is always fun making the rounds on recycling day after a big chocolate holiday like Valentine's Day. I picked up four large acrylic Ferraro Richer boxes; each one will hold up to 120 mini soil blocks, and the lids can be used as a humidity dome or as an extra seed starting tray if needed. I like that they stack. I also have have a smaller box that holds 60 blocks. Along my walk I noticed a very creative bit of garden art too!
 

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