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Rugosa Rose problems and questions

Discussion in 'Flowers & Roses' started by SPedigrees, Jun 16, 2019.

  1. Jun 21, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Burying a rose graft is actually a common practice in cold climates.
    You do have to be watchful of rootstock canes emerging, but it doesn't happen as often as it seems it would.
     
  2. Jun 21, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    it would surprise me to see anyone bury a rose plant here. :)

    Mom loves roses. one year we planted 30 rose bushes and i hoped that they would survive. within a few years all of them were dead. the combination of clays, fogs, animals and Mom just didn't work.

    last year she planted roses for one of my brothers and they all were in such sad shape this past spring that she took them out and replaced them. so we now have five very beat up rose bushes that actually have flowers on them inside the fenced gardens for the first time in 10-15yrs or so. almost all of them were barely green twigs and i would not be surprised if they are root stock plants now. they all had a lot of borer damage too so that had to all be cut away. i don't think we have to worry about much aphid damage here. always plenty of lady bugs around. when i was growing roses as a kid we always had aphids on the roses and i was using powdered poisons to keep them off. i didn't get back to the more natural methods of gardening until i moved back here and started helping out.
     
  3. Jun 22, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    I get around a lot of landscapes. ;)

    I don't want roses for myself so much anymore, just the rugosas on the lawn edge. Mostly because I'm over anything with prickers.
    Having to prune 100+ roses every spring my arms looked like I stuck them in a bag of angry cats. No thanks.
     
    SPedigrees, Carol Dee and flowerbug like this.
  4. Jun 22, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    i really understand that. sad to say in ways because i love the smell and color combinations of some of the roses, but in the end i was hoping these weren't going to make it because i knew i'd be giving my blood sacrifices to them in one way or another...
     
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  5. Jun 22, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    There are some carnivorous roses at one of my jobs. They grow on a steep bank in a wild tangle for erosion control with a lot of other native and purposely planted plants. I don't have to deal with them very often, thankfully. They are huge big arching buggers.

    Recently the owners had the stairs that lead down the bank restained. The poor painter doing the job asked me what the terrible plant was that grabbed and hung on, he had to get down on the bank to stain the cross beam supports and the roses grabbed him and shredded his shirt before he got away. I felt bad because it was also a hot day and that bank faces south. So he got tenderized and cooked.
     
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  6. Jun 22, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    they can be pretty vicious for sure... i had an orange colored hybrid that was the worst as the entire stem was covered in thorns.

    by the time i really got into the roses though i had already been working with cactuses so i was used to dealing with the spikes. accidents did still happen and were painful but it was just something i thought was the price of admission...

    i sure wouldn't want to be in that line of business. i wonder if the guy doing the work was someone who quoted it or they were just the peon who got stuck doing it. i'm not sure you've done this on a horse or not but something like running or riding a bike through blackberry brambles or raspberry canes could really do a lot of damage. ouch.
     
  7. Jun 22, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Uh oh, hijack ahead :hide ...

    Long ago I was trail blazing on my horse, looking for good trails to ride on. I spent some time following a deer track that ended in a tangle of low tree branches and brush so had to backtrack. I could see up the hill where my starting place was and set out bushwhacking a shortcut.
    I realized I was cutting through a rose bramble patch and the footing wasn't visible so I dismounted to lead my patient horse through. I was far enough in to not make it worth backing out so just soldiered on. That was painful. A lot of the prickers broke off in my jeans and I was reminded of my lack of foresight for a few miles home.

    this hijack did contain the word rose
     
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  8. Jun 23, 2019
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    I live next to the rose capital of the world. Tyler, Texas grows a LOT of roses. They are in green houses everywhere. Rose nurseries are everywhere.
     
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  9. Jun 27, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    I would like to know how to get some of these. Maybe next year I am pulling the rest of the old cattle fencing by the street and next to my neighbor to the south. I want to put in a "faux" horse fence, which means wooden fencing, with the planks on the outside,which is something you never do to enclose a horse. They will kick the plank right off and escape. (If it is on the INside it can just be cracked, but remains.) ANYWAY, I want to plant roses and other perennials between the posts. Really knarly roses would fit the bill. Please list. Thank you very much. (READ like Elvis would say it.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2019
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  10. Jun 28, 2019
    flowerbug

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    i would not get any hybrids or grafted roses if that is your intended purpose for them. you want ones that will be able to come up from suckers.

    the question though is why you would want to spend that much $ as such a thing would not be a cheap thing to do (both the fence and getting all the plants purchased and planted).
     

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