Say Cheese!

so lucky

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(I'll say this quickly, because I know I have said it here before) If you can find raw milk from Jersey or Guernsey cows, you probably won't have the lactose intolerance problem. Some small difference in the milk...makes all the difference.
We pay $5 a half gallon for raw milk here, and there is a waiting list to get to buy it. I am thinking about making yogurt with it, now, too.
 

digitS'

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Hmmm.

I've never been sure if I am lactose intolerant. I have assumed I would be because Dad had problems with milk. Therefore, when I began having a problem the MD's diagnosed as resulting from anti-inflammatories, I quit using milk.

I continue to eat yogurt and cheese. It was the critters that had that problem with too much milk, years ago!

This thread didn't go anywhere I thought it would go . .:eek: .

Steve
 

bobm

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I don't go along with the whole calorie thing but...

A lot of cheese contains artificial preservatives, the healthy part is diluted with less desirable ingredients, and the milk usually comes from commercial farms so you can expect some kind of growth hormone and a lot of puss in it (from infected, over-worked utters).
Just how many commercial dairies have you personally visited to make these claims or are these claims from hearsay ? In Cal. , a dairy would be out of business in a second if they delivered this type of milk to a processor as laboratory inspection tests before the milk was even unloaded from the tank truck and dumped. Here in Washington, my neighbor works for a large dairy milk processing plant ( he is in charge of over 100 dairy tanker trucks plus tanker trailers plus another hundred truck trailers so they have to follow the law to the letter of the health law and then some ) that sells their products from Canadian / Washington border to Cal. / Oregon border. Growth hormones haven't been used in years and as for puss from infected cow udders, large dairies have Resident Vets. ( smaller dairies have Vets. on retainer and are on call ) that look after the health and nutrition of the cows and treat them immediately and their milk is discarded. If the infection is too severe, the cow is put down immediately. Law suits you know !!! Here is something for thought.... just how safe is the milk from old Bessy from a self sufficient neighbor's barn ? In Oregon, Just last spring there were several city children that were hospitalized after drinking raw milk from a small farm herd and after laboratory testing, were shut down by the State Health Dept.. :caf
 

digitS'

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Yay!

This is what I wanted to hear!

Steve
ready to :


who moved my cheese!
 

TheSeedObsesser

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Just how many commercial dairies have you personally visited to make these claims or are these claims from hearsay ? In Cal. , a dairy would be out of business in a second if they delivered this type of milk to a processor as laboratory inspection tests before the milk was even unloaded from the tank truck and dumped. Here in Washington, my neighbor works for a large dairy milk processing plant ( he is in charge of over 100 dairy tanker trucks plus tanker trailers plus another hundred truck trailers so they have to follow the law to the letter of the health law and then some ) that sells their products from Canadian / Washington border to Cal. / Oregon border. Growth hormones haven't been used in years and as for puss from infected cow udders, large dairies have Resident Vets. ( smaller dairies have Vets. on retainer and are on call ) that look after the health and nutrition of the cows and treat them immediately and their milk is discarded. If the infection is too severe, the cow is put down immediately. Law suits you know !!! Here is something for thought.... just how safe is the milk from old Bessy from a self sufficient neighbor's barn ? In Oregon, Just last spring there were several city children that were hospitalized after drinking raw milk from a small farm herd and after laboratory testing, were shut down by the State Health Dept.. :caf

@bobm

Those claims was taken out of the books that I and the rest of my family have read and the documentaries that I and the rest of my family have watched (a lot). All of the information came from independent researchers. I couldn't sat what documents books/ the information came from, they did include pictures, plenty of footage, and statistics/ company names. (It was horrifying). Many of these companies (not strictly talking dairies anymore) won't even let people outside of the company in or answer interview questions because of what goes on it there. I'll see if I can get the names of those documentaries/books to post here. Some of the documentaries might still be on Netflix or Amazon Prime.

All of what you just mentioned is on the West Coast, they're very health/ eco - conscience over there, for the most part. Things are different outside of your region. It's all been hidden from the public by the same companies so that they can protect their profit (farming the way they do they can get a larger mass of food, although that means unhealthy food, this means more profit.) Luckily a small amount of people have found all of this out and gotten the information out, that information has spread. Those companies have have so much money that they'll take down any individual people/ small companies that try to take them to court for it. Some laws have loopholes, easily visible to some people.

And here's something to consider about the whole raw milk issue, you know how bad are food system is all together and how overused conventional medicine is, right? Consider how much that may weaken the immune system of anybody, give it a good thought. Then I'll throw this at you - if an animal is raised in a good, clean environment then anything from that animal should be good to eat or drink. I guess that what I'm trying to say is this - if you put a body that is dependent on antibiotics and vaccines to keep them from getting sick, a body that hasn't been treated quite right, and feed it something that is very healthy and tainted - then your almost destined to get that body sick, it shocks the person's immune system . There is a lot more that factors into this issue than many people think - our food system, our health, the health of our food, and everything else is all connected like a web.
 
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TheSeedObsesser

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Steve, not exactly saying that you should give up store-bought cheese, that's your choice. Just throwing some facts out there.

Kuska, you should be safe from pussy-cheese.


I honesty wouldn't worry about completely reforming you diet, there's way too much out there that could be considering "bad" in one way or another. Constantly worrying about it will likely decrease your health from the constant stress of trying to get rid of it all.
 

Pulsegleaner

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Yes, triple cream brie is the best!

Mary

Depends on how good the triple creme is. A lot of the domestic ones taste of butterfat....and little else. For triple cremes, I tend to prefer the cheeses designed to be triple crème the laws are looses here, but in France the actual factual Brie de Meaux can't be above or below single), like Brillat Savarin. But my favorite of the bloomy family is probably Gratte-Paille which is a double crème.
I don't nearly as much cheese as I used to. I have what I would define as "variable lactose tolerance" Some days I can eat rather substantial amounts of cheese, others I can get an intolerance reaction from soy milk which doesn't have any lactose ( I suspect part of the issue is that, regually my stomach gets so acidic that it will rebel against anything that even feels like it has fat content.) But when I can get away with eating "real" cheese my two favorites are more or less twins from opposite sides of the Atlantic; the domestic Cayuga Blue and the French Persillé du Beujolais. Both are basically the same sort of thing; well aged raw goat milk semi-firm blues; a fairly rare combination (most big dairy goat's milk blues are pasteurized, or sold pretty young. And a lot of them have the mold placed only on the surface, which doesn't give the same type of flavor as piercing the cheese).
Unfortunately, very little Persillé get's to this country (and most that does is the related Persillé du Tignes, which despite, the name is very rarely blued.) The Bedford Cheese shop in NYC carries it, but not often and it is expensive.
Cayuga Blue is a lot easier to get, but here in NYC it's a bit of a crapshoot. Murray's cheese carries it but ever since they built their private caves, they've been trying to age all of their cheeses themselves, and they can't do Cayuga correctly. They also stink at selecting wheels, some will be so unripe they are chalk, other so past prime they are ammonia to the core. Fairway's a little better (since they tend to use the pre wrapped wedges cut at the dairy itself) but even those are no guarantee of quality. And to cap it off Lively run (the dairy) now only uses raw milk SOMETIMES and doesn't call one anything different from the other. So basically I have to taste every time I buy and I end up walking away disappointed more often than not.
 

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