Solving the Squash Bug dilemma...for good!

flowerbug

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I stopped fertilizing my squash & cucumbers, and have had few problems with the bugs & beetles since. Both were no-shows this year.
as some further support, we've grown cucumbers for years here and never see squash bugs or borers on them. i've never fertilized them either. the soil here is pretty heavy clay so whatever i get in the gardens from the worms/worm castings i use is sufficient and we get a great crop of cucumbers (last year between 900-1200lbs from 15 plants or so).

squash bugs and borers on the squash. yes, we get those. so far rotational planting does ok along with the planting of the tougher squash varieties. i have some new types to try this year and also i'm saving up citrus peelings to see if that will work to mask the smell enough as an experiment...
 

YourRabbitGirl

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:epThat photo made me want to drive down there, spray bottle in hand... but it looks like the plants are already toast. Still, it wouldn't hurt to kill the brood before they can hibernate.
Give a small amount of liquid Castile soap into a spray bottle and fill the bottle with water for a homemade squash bug spray. In the morning, spray the affected plants, aiming the spray at the base of the plant and the leaf underneath.
 

Zeedman

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Give a small amount of liquid Castile soap into a spray bottle and fill the bottle with water for a homemade squash bug spray. In the morning, spray the affected plants, aiming the spray at the base of the plant and the leaf underneath.
The soap formula I posted earlier in this thread is highly effective. I agree with @Dirtmechanic that soap alone is not strong enough to kill the tougher insects (like beetles), the added ingredients reduce the ability of insects to recover as they dry.
 

YourRabbitGirl

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The soap formula I posted earlier in this thread is highly effective. I agree with @Dirtmechanic that soap alone is not strong enough to kill the tougher insects (like beetles), the added ingredients reduce the ability of insects to recover as they dry.
I really thought they are squash bugs. Often, squash bugs and stink bugs are mistaken for each other. They are similar in shape and both bugs have a disagreeable odor when crushed. {learned my lesson the hard way)
 
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