Somehow, It's Funny that Way

Phaedra

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digitS'

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"Tell him to spread it out on a table and iron it..."
It may be the origin of the word planet in that they planets "wander" about as though they are on "a plain" rather than staying in one place as a feature in the landscape.

Humans needed better sight to recognize the round nature of planets. Obviously, the round sun wasn't the same as the Earth. The round Moon might have been thought of just as a big rock.

Living on islands with a large sea and horizon to look out on and travel on must have been puzzling to the Greeks who had a curious nature. Can we imagine that they might have stood on a hill and felt as though they were not standing quite vertical? ... no wonder that they grew grapes and made wine.

;) digitS'
 

digitS'

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Okay. You have your table in front of you at the market. The sun is up, customers are beginning to arrive. Your offerings should be separated on the table because they have different values but are otherwise, somewhat similar. Section off the table into separate areas. Quickly now, here they come! Tab Tab Tab Tab Tab -- there we are!

Spaced out . . .

Semicolon: You see, all that follows relates. Now that period, it put a stop to thing, as does this one. The semicolon is different because there is somewhat of a continuous flow. Only somewhat, differing from a comma, where you just hope to slow things down a bit. But you see, it's really a combination of both. Two or more concepts, separate but related. No special need to put a period on it but I will.

Steve :)
 

flowerbug

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... No special need to put a period on it but I will.

Steve :)

and as a bridge to another topic did you know that "pont" is the word in French for "bridge"... ? i did not know that until this morning a few moments ago. the chances of me remembering this is very slight but now that i've typed something about it the chances go up. the chances of me ever needing this bit of information is probably close to zero.

i'm also somewhat amused by the "space bar" as that would be the spot to meet someone for a drink bulb, but at the same time on the same device we have the "tab key" and the "semicolon key" like they unlock something, but in the end they're all just symbols, the space is certainly more meaninful, like in music where it gives room to each symbol so they are all easier to decypher quickly... " " no space at all is hard on the eyes, especially in the morning before i've fully cracked my eyelids open "" so the lack of space there clearly matches how much space there is between my eyelids when closed... '' " <- you would need a very good sense of vision to see the difference between those three symbols... but i think that is enough play for the moment. :) good morning... :)
 

digitS'

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@flowerbug , I wonder if the  point of using that word was for bridge building. Two points of land, a narrow space between them, perhaps over at river, build your bridge. Perhaps from the time following 1066 with French speakers in charge and the English speaking British building the bridge.

Reading yesterday about 19th century bridge building in the local area. Folks needing to cross the river and the ferry owner charging too much $. Spokane Bridge was the first community of settlers with stores, etc.

Then, somebody built a bridge down stream. Probably a Toll War was about to happen! Owners at Spokane Bridge bought out the competitor. Blew up his bridge - with dynamite ..! Free market system.

Steve
 

Pulsegleaner

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and as a bridge to another topic did you know that "pont" is the word in French for "bridge"... ? i did not know that until this morning a few moments ago. the chances of me remembering this is very slight but now that i've typed something about it the chances go up. the chances of me ever needing this bit of information is probably close to zero.
You obviously did not have or were not kids during the Raffi/Sharon Lois and Bram era. At least one of them (Both I think) did versions of the French folk/children's song "Sur le Pont, d' Avignon." (because the final "t" is silent in French, these words rhyme.) Listen to that a couple of hundred times, and you will DEFINTIELY know what "pont" means!

Same way I learned the word for cabbage from "Savez vous Plantes de Choux?". (I also learned that loup-garou means werewolf, but since I don't know the exact title of that song, I'll skip over it.)
 

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