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misfitmorgan

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looked up Japanese milk bread. thanks! sounds similar to a roll recipe we use. good!
We love it!! I use the king Arthur flour recipe but I make the rue then whisk in the rest of the milk then the egg and the butter so there is no waiting on the rue to cool and i can continue with the recipe right away. Literally takes 10 minutes until the dough is kneaded, oiled and in the bowl to rise. I also roll the loaf into 4 sections instead of rolls as king arthur suggests.
 

digitS'

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Greece, @misfitmorgan ? Obviously with that experience, you will be able to recommend a good brand of olive oil.

;) Cloves are a favorite but the addition required is almost minute.

We have a friend who recognizes that he is not a very good cook but becomes inspired at various times of the year :). He is the boyfriend of another friend and they have maintained separate residences for over 20 years. His cooking imagination is only one of the reasons ...

He had DW help him with his seasonal pie-baking by soliciting her skills in doing the crusts. He brought the ingredients but only enough for half the pies he decided to bake. Going home with the crusts, his imagination got the better of him for bottom crusts. Let me just say that they were only 50% crushed Graham crackers.

His spice choices are equally varied and unrestrained. When he brought "our" pie, he listed at least 5 spices that he put in there. Some, I would not have even thought of. Fortunately, they were apparently in limited amounts!

He hasn't always used such restraint with his measuring spoon. His enthusiastic creativity seems to be what he is demonstrating as he confidently tells us each time that no recipe was followed. Me telling him a couple of years ago that I try for simplicity when I'm inexperienced made no impression.

We use my mother's, and Good Housekeeping's, "refrigerator rolls" recipe for both rolls and bread but not real often. Company coming and starting the night before with limited kneading required helps when there is lots of different dishes to prepare.

Steve
 

misfitmorgan

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Greece, @misfitmorgan ? Obviously with that experience, you will be able to recommend a good brand of olive oil.

;) Cloves are a favorite but the addition required is almost minute.

We have a friend who recognizes that he is not a very good cook but becomes inspired at various times of the year :). He is the boyfriend of another friend and they have maintained separate residences for over 20 years. His cooking imagination is only one of the reasons ...

He had DW help him with his seasonal pie-baking by soliciting her skills in doing the crusts. He brought the ingredients but only enough for half the pies he decided to bake. Going home with the crusts, his imagination got the better of him for bottom crusts. Let me just say that they were only 50% crushed Graham crackers.

His spice choices are equally varied and unrestrained. When he brought "our" pie, he listed at least 5 spices that he put in there. Some, I would not have even thought of. Fortunately, they were apparently in limited amounts!

He hasn't always used such restraint with his measuring spoon. His enthusiastic creativity seems to be what he is demonstrating as he confidently tells us each time that no recipe was followed. Me telling him a couple of years ago that I try for simplicity when I'm inexperienced made no impression.

We use my mother's, and Good Housekeeping's, "refrigerator rolls" recipe for both rolls and bread but not real often. Company coming and starting the night before with limited kneading required helps when there is lots of different dishes to prepare.

Steve
Extra Virgin?? I only lived there for 3 months :lol:...then my visa was up.

Your right on the cloves....a restrained hand is very needed.

Your friend reminds me of my sister....results can be questionable even with a recipe. She substitutes things........

In fairness I do to but everyone loves my food, even food people say they dont like.....they like when i make it most times. I've always been interested in cooking though since I was like 5-6yrs old and my sister wasnt until she realized she would need to feed a husband and kids, that thought dawned on her at 25yrs old.

For your friend, some people never will get flavor pairings or techniques but at least he isnt a quitter.

I've never tried refrigerator breads. I do it the opposite, prep everything else the day before then make the rolls on the morning of. Maybe I will try some, I have seen a recipe for fridge monkey bread I might give a go. Thanks for the idea!
 
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flowerbug

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We love it!! I use the king Arthur flour recipe but I make the rue then whisk in the rest of the milk then the egg and the butter so there is no waiting on the rue to cool and i can continue with the recipe right away. Literally takes 10 minutes until the dough is kneaded, oiled and in the bowl to rise. I also roll the loaf into 4 sections instead of rolls as king arthur suggests.
add a little cardamom in there and you'd be pretty close to nissua (a Finnish bread). :) which is really good toasted too...
 

misfitmorgan

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I've heard of Japanese Milk Bread! Some people on my sourdough facebook group make it. It always looks so big and fluffy. Is yours like that @misfitmorgan?

Mary
Yes it gets huge, very fluffy and light! It so big I have to cut a quarter off the end to fit it in the bread baggies they sell.

add a little cardamom in there and you'd be pretty close to nissua (a Finnish bread). :) which is really good toasted too...
That does sound good!
 

YourRabbitGirl

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Do you ever get excited about toast?

Wow. It seems like the least-exciting food in the world. Right? Unless you have a good AppleButter recipe :D!

Or apricot jam or grape jelly or ... ;)

I was inspired to post this reading @ninnymary 's Gardening Humor about not being tempted by an apple. She needs eclairs 🤭 .

My AppleButter didn't have apples from the garden, the Granny Smiths were given to me. I hope that I don't offend anyone; those aren't my favorite apple variety. But! They sure made good apple butter :).

I will post the recipe here in a few minutes. It may take longer to find it in the recipe folder than typing it out -- simple, dimple!

Do you have a favorite jam recipe! Favorite varieties of fruit to use?

Steve
Apricot Jelly is the best... I mean, I can have that every morning and I won't even mind... I can even have that as an evening snack..
 

YourRabbitGirl

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either apricots or plums dried make excellent snacks. just have to go light on them until the body adjusts... :)
apricots and plums? yeah they a good to nibble at... what I'm really wanting to make is pickles (real pickle relish) we really like that as a garnish... I hope someone can teach me how to make them.
 

flowerbug

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there are many different recipes for pickles on-line and in various cookbooks. my own experience is that you can put a lot of time into growing something and then processing it and still come up not liking the results.

so to me the important questions are what do you like? start from there, with spices and textures of ingredients and then picking your liquids if you want to can to preserve them instead of fermenting them.

without having some idea of what you might like or what you might want to put in them it seems a rather too broad a question to answer easily.

for us pickles are canned and preserved in a mixture of vinegar, water, salt and a little sugar. the cucumbers are picked and scrubbed then they're cut up to fit in the jars along with some dill. we don't put anything else in there most of the time.

we also make bread and butter pickles which have a lot more sugar and onions are included. the cucumbers and onions are cut up and then sprinkled with kosher salt and left to sit for a few hours to draw out some of the moisture. then they are quickly rinsed and then mixed with sugar and vinegar and then sealed up to keep.

both of these types of pickles are not going to be crisp after more than a year in most cases because the cucumbers themselves are not always the best. some cucumbers are just not that good when pickled. so you do want an actual cucumber meant to be pickled instead of eaten fresh.

some people process with lye or lime or whatever it is to try to improve crispness. as of yet i've not been able to convince Mom that any of the old methods or using such things as Pickle Crisp would be something to do. i want to try the Pickle Crisp sometime because i have heard people say it helps, but we don't use the sweet pickles in a way that crispness is important and for the regular dill pickles they don't last long enough to get too mushy. so why complicate things if they are working well enough for our needs?

perhaps this season i'll have some garlic cloves to put in some jars for a change. dunno. we'll see. :) we may not be doing many pickles this year. Mom said that today. we're not sure yet what the number of plants or quarts as a target will be. we have time to talk about this yet. planting season is a few months away. :)
 
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