What are You Eating from the Garden?

Just-Moxie

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I just picked some wild growing blackberries tonight. I wish I could cultivate some.
 

digitS'

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Amaranth.

From the hoop house ... which needs to go! Too hot in there ...

But, the green and red amaranth seems to like it and the bok choy is beginning to play out in there. Amaranth is part of my efforts to have summer greens. Chard was sown in the garden. Now, I've gotta find more of the amaranth seed for the outdoors. Wonder if I can get that plastic film off the hoop house in today's windy conditions ...

Steve
 

digitS'

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Portuguese kale.

But, not from the 2017 plants, not from the hoop house --- from the open garden. Yes, they were started indoors, moved into 4-packs, and set out several weeks ago. They have grown quickly and the outer leaves were harvested.

Scotch and Italian kale are available but they were set out in the hoop house beds. In the open garden, those plants, along with the Siberian kale, have grown very little.

And the kale plants from 2017? The last of them were pulled today.

How's that for a leafy green available 365 days a year in a northern climate?!!

:D Steve
planning another rhubarb cobbler for Saturday brunch
 

thejenx

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This week we ate peas, radishes, strawberries and rhubarb from the garden.
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IMG-20180608-WA0004.jpeg
 

digitS'

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More swiss chard, rhubarb, strawberries, New Zealand spinach, palm cabbage, Capuchin and red currant berries. Curious about the New Zealand spinach

I'm curious about the palm cabbage! It sounds like it might be a cabbage that doesn't form a head ... like Portuguese kale (Beira Tronchuda), maybe?

Searching quickly online didn't help. Something about palm trees and, I guess, eating the terminal bud ..? Could that be what you meant?

I have not had much interest in New Zealand spinach since my father grew it in the 1980's. We only somewhat liked the flavor but it spread like crazy - almost becoming a weed!

I didn't come up with a definition of Capuchin berry, either.

Steve :hu
 

thejenx

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@digitS' I should have done better research for the English names! :lol:

Lacinato Kale is what I meant.
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Also capuchin is a kind of pea with purple pods. It's quite common in Holland. I don't think there is even an English name for them, here we call them kapucijners (Pisum sativum subsp).
kapucijners.jpg

I took both images from the internets.
 

Carol Dee

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More swiss chard, rhubarb, strawberries, New Zealand spinach, palm cabbage, Capuchin and red currant berries. Curious about the New Zealand spinach since its my first time growing them. I'm impressed by their growth. Nice thick leaves too!
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New Zealand lettuce is our FAVORITE. Husbands parents always had it. (Theirs even came back each year on its own, self seeding I guess! ) We need to plant each spring.
 

digitS'

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@thejenx , you do great! I studied German in school. Good Heavens! The further I got, the more trouble I was in.

Yes, Lacinato kale :). I have that again this year. We call it Italian kale :).

My father's European American family came to North America in colonial times. He was a Dutch shipbuilder, according to what I have read.

Let's see ... I grow a tomato that is supposed to be from Holland, Bloody Butcher. I really look forward to it. The golden cherries are likely to be the first, with a few tomatoes. After that, Bloody Butchers with plum-size fruit, very flavorful! They can compete on flavor with any and have a full season of production.

I'm a little sorry that we don't have Tyfon Holland Greens in the garden. They really should be more popular in US gardens. Those people who may only eat cabbage once in awhile because they think other greens are too bitter, should try Tyfon. Very easy to grow and very mild ...

Steve
 
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