When Do You Eat Salad ?

catjac1975

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My family and everyone we knew all ways served the salad after dinner, it was suppose to help you digest the meal. It always contained iceberg lettuce, cucumber, and tomato always with oil and vinegar dressing. It was very strange when we ate out and salad was served before meal. As a adult who eats out often I still would rather have salad after the meal. When do you like your salad? What do you like in your salad?
I eat salad first. I think I eat less if I do. And I like it.
 

ninnymary

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Tossed with a splash of a light olive oil and a sprinkle of white wine vinegar. English cucumber, fresh shrimp, sweet onion, crumbled feta cheese and some dried oregano sprinkled on top and mixed in. One of our favorites.

Annette
Thanks Annette. I always make shrimp tacos but your salad gives me another option for shrimp.

Mary
 

dickiebird

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If it aint a Caesar salad, it's not a salad!!!
And don't try serving me one made with iceberg lettuce.

THANX RICH
 

Beekissed

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I have found that eating fruit or salad first when going to a buffet style eatery, I tend to eat WAY less of the less beneficial foods. I love fresh pineapple with salt on it, so it's not to uncommon for me to just get a plate of pineapple as my first plate at the buffet. Folks look at me funny but it's just one of those things I can't get enough of. :D
 

Pulsegleaner

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During the summer I make a lot of "minimalist" horatiki, (that salad you see on a lot of Greek menus) "Minimalist in that I leave out the olives (don't like 'em) green peppers (don't like 'em AND can't digest them) and the feta (usually don't have any really good feta on hand unless I've been to Yaranush in the last day or so, and without it, the salad will actually keep for more than a day or two, so I can make extra) that leaves

Tomatoes (heirloom, which is why I only do it in the summer usually. I tend to prefer Green Zebras)
Onions (red)
Cucumber (English/Kirby if I have to (Japanese are not wet enough) but when I have full farmers market choice, I prefer a kiva type (one of those heirlooms with the crackly cantaloupe like skin)
Olive oil (whichever I have on hand provided it is a good one)
Vinegar (Red wine, as strong as I can buy)
Salt (sea; preferably (when I have it) Dead Sea or Kalahari Desert (which is still technically considered a sea salt)
Pepper, freshly ground (will mix in some powdered long pepper* or cubeb pepper if I happen to have any around, for depth)
Lemon zest (freshly micro-planed, whole lemon's worth)
Lemon Juice (from the lemon I just zested)
Cuban Oregano (2-3 sprigs) and Spanish Thyme (2-3 leaves) freshly picked and crushed (This is actually the most important discovery I have found. Since Spanish Thyme and Cuban Oregano are succulents they actually have juice which means they integrate into the marinade much faster than the normal kinds of the herbs do.)

1. Slice tomatoes into quarters and cucumbers and onions into thin slices (the thinner the better)
2. Place all ingredients in bowl (note, as you have probably figured out, zest the lemon before you cut it in half and juice it.)
3. Crush vigorously with a potato masher
4. Allow to sit for 15 minutes or more (the longer it sits, the more the onions will mellow)
5. Eat, with crusty bread to sop up extra marinade.

*Note: If you are planning to grind long pepper (Piper longum) yourself you will probably need a dedicated coffee grinder to do it, as the grains are too big and too hard for a standard pepper grinder to handle. If you want to do it the old fashioned way with a stone mortal and pestle, be my guess, but you'll probably need one HELL of a set of arm muscles to do it (someday I'll have to ask someone who is Indian how they do it) Cubebs (sometimes called comet tail pepper) are softer than normal peppercorns, so they grind just fine in a standard grinder.)
 

digitS'

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Drag the spaghetti out of the water with a fork and taste it. Yes, it has to be "to the tooth" especially since it will cook a little more on the plate and under the hot pasta sauce.

Hey, Pulsegleaner!

Were you referring to the Montreal seasoning?

I can't find it on the Penzey site. Something similar?

Steve
 

Beekissed

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Salad With the meal.

Is it ready? Daughter just brought spaghetti to OK for the table. I wonder how you test, taste or like your spaghetti.
We'll eat the salad with the spaghetti!
I like mine thin and al dente. It's my favorite type of pasta to add to the salad...not much, but just enough.
 
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