2020 Little Easy Bean Network - An Exciting Adventure In Heirloom Beans !

Myrthryn

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I was laying down to sleep, and realized I didn't see any black tepary beans in the 'pile'. The tepary I grew came from Joseph Lofthouse in Utah. An assortment of colors, definitely not bush, did some fair climbing. Planning on growing them again due to their drought hardiness, and intentionally planting the few blacks I got back after season one. Absolutely willing to share.
 

flowerbug

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there are supposedly some tepary crosses that were made with other common beans to get their drought tolerance traits - i've not seen those made available to general gardening population, but perhaps someone has those. anyways, i'm always interested in beans of all types.

my own cross-breeding efforts are towards getting the shorter season bush beans that will grow here and be mostly done by Sept 15th. also smaller beans because in my experience with our soils and changing weather the beans that are smaller tend to finish up in the pod better and there won't be as many clinkers in the pods. i call 'em clinkers because they aren't finished right, they may be hollow or sound funny when sorting them, or they may have the seed coat not completely closed up. they're edible, but not seed that can be replanted or stored well IMO.

i notice you said "pole" beans are what you do mostly, so you are at the other side of things. my own plantings are almost all bush beans and some semi-runners have come along as crosses or because i want to work with those beans (yellow eye aka molasses face is one of them).

and since winter is coming on if you are needing some bean reading material there are also the old bean threads. i'll probably start re-reading through them as i'm not finding many books to read at the library or on-line and i always like to have something to read handy. :)
 

Myrthryn

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there are supposedly some tepary crosses that were made with other common beans to get their drought tolerance traits - i've not seen those made available to general gardening population, but perhaps someone has those. anyways, i'm always interested in beans of all types.

my own cross-breeding efforts are towards getting the shorter season bush beans that will grow here and be mostly done by Sept 15th. also smaller beans because in my experience with our soils and changing weather the beans that are smaller tend to finish up in the pod better and there won't be as many clinkers in the pods. i call 'em clinkers because they aren't finished right, they may be hollow or sound funny when sorting them, or they may have the seed coat not completely closed up. they're edible, but not seed that can be replanted or stored well IMO.

i notice you said "pole" beans are what you do mostly, so you are at the other side of things. my own plantings are almost all bush beans and some semi-runners have come along as crosses or because i want to work with those beans (yellow eye aka molasses face is one of them).

and since winter is coming on if you are needing some bean reading material there are also the old bean threads. i'll probably start re-reading through them as i'm not finding many books to read at the library or on-line and i always like to have something to read handy. :)
I'm interested in the short season crops as well. Grew some Jacob's cattle for that very reason. Season of '18 I transplanted them outside, (as well as some peanuts) and had green beans second week in June with no transplant issues though I've heard beans are bad that way. Quite tasty. The orcus beans planted later had a much sweeter taste fresh picked.

Mainly doing the pole beans for increased production.

In reference to the black tepary, I actually don't recall any blacks in my mix, but I could be wrong. Is it possible that a Trail of Tears nearby caused the cross? After harvesting them, I did go back to the source of my seed and noted that there were a few blacks. Hard to say though. Likely to sort and plant them by color next year. First tepary soaking atm for a taste test later.

Which beans do well for you in Michigan?
 

flowerbug

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Which beans do well for you in Michigan?
it is possible in a blend that you will get variations due to the recessive genes mixing and some colors/patterns may not return until those combinations happen again. also for me here some beans change based upon soil chemistry/where they are planted and what the weather is like. i don't have any experience with tepary beans, but i have read about them. :)

as for which beans do well here, i'm constantly trying to breed or find more that work in our gardens, we have a mix of soils with only a few gardens being sandy or loamy and most of the rest being more of the subsoil clay that has been amended through the years. here's a few that i grow quite often, but there are many others i wish i had room for each year.

- Top Notch wax bean (fresh eating).

- Red Ryder, a small red kidney bean (dry beans).

- Fordhook Lima beans (shellies and dry beans).

- Purple Dove (for fresh eating, shellies and as a dry bean).

- Huey (my own cross for a firm chili dry bean).

i have a lot of crosses and other beans that i'm evaluating all the time, plus a bunch of other beans that i've grown but they've not made it yet into the bulk bean rotation. not enough space to grow out hundreds of beans each season. if i can get crosses of Purple Dove with any of the lesser performing beans i'd be happy (Dapple Grey and Yellow Eye are two i'd love to improve).

nothing i have grown on the fence has been reliable enough to keep growing, either they are not finishing early enough or they have issues and i don't want those genes mixing with the other beans. we don't have enough fence space anyways to make them a priority for me.
 

Bluejay77

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Hello @Myrthryn !

Very nice to have you come and join us. I think you will have all kinds of bean fun with this group. Wow you are about as far south as Effingham, Illinois ! According to what I see on google you should have about over a month longer growing season than I do in Woodstock, Il. Effingham is rated at 205 days and I suppossedly I have 167 days. I don't think I have 167 days. For beans I think it's more like 130 days here. Maybe for potatoes and peas yeah.

Anyway so glad you are here.
 

Myrthryn

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Hello @Myrthryn !

Very nice to have you come and join us. I think you will have all kinds of bean fun with this group. Wow you are about as far south as Effingham, Illinois ! According to what I see on google you should have about over a month longer growing season than I do in Woodstock, Il. Effingham is rated at 205 days and I suppossedly I have 167 days. I don't think I have 167 days. For beans I think it's more like 130 days here. Maybe for potatoes and peas yeah.

Anyway so glad you are here.
Not quite as far south as Effingham, but close enough I gather. I think I will have a great time with this group. Exchanged seeds with friends long distance already (even a helpful bumpship to Canada once). Got a tomato competition going on next year with some local growers. Sent you an email at the comcast address as to varieties I'm interested in growing out.
As for growing season, it seems to be shrinking, and I am probably not alone in thinking that the frost came too soon. :(
Glad to be here.
 

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