Gaspe flint corn

thistlebloom

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@Tomv , apparently I was wrong about Sherck Seeds having Gaspe available. I ordered some and the page came back with a order cancelled, or payment canceled message so I figured it wasn't available and the web page hadn't been updated.
But I received my seeds last week, and my payment went through so I don't know what that was all about.
His Gaspe are a composite, so maybe not what you want.
 

marshallsmyth

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a few things to note, i have to hill my long season corn, but if i have my plant spaced a 3 ft row spacing and 1 ft in row, there is enough dirt in between every other row to do the hilling, meaning between every other row i make a bed between rows of corn plants, this year i interplanted gaspe flint between mesquakie indian 120 day corn. i only put one row of gaspe between mesquakie, but next year, i will plant 2-3 rows between every other row of mesquakie. i hope they get pollinated as they are at quite wide spacing, 6 ft rows, 6 inch spacing in row, but it certainly works to get 2 crops from one space. ive also thought i could probably and will try next year, to grow gaspe in 6 ft beds, but then come upon this time of year undersow with another long season corn, one to get my pollination schedules different and get multiple crops per season, by the time the long season corn needs hilling, the short season corn should be edible in the green corn stage or later for drying. i heard on hear a notion, that we could see 5 years without a summer and this crop would be favorable in those conditions. that is an understatement, we are in an interglacial period, they last from 10,000-35,000 years out of every 100,000 years, aka we spend most of our time as humans in a glaciated period. its been 12000 years since the last one so it could be anyday the glaciers advance, with 100 percent chance in 20,000 years. How? supervolcanoes block out the sun, its part of the earth cooling, and i dont think we take into account how much heat is left in the earth. i believe the volcanic activity will continue until enough pressure is released. heres the kicker, the vibration of the surface of the earth is effecting the speed at witch the earths heats decays, the more vibrational energy we have the more entropy works against that heat and diffuses the energy. animals have been getting smaller since the dinosaurs one because there is less heat on this earth for them as a food source, but 2 it slows down the decays of the earths heat.
 

marshallsmyth

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a few things to note, i have to hill my long season corn, but if i have my plant spaced a 3 ft row spacing and 1 ft in row, there is enough dirt in between every other row to do the hilling, meaning between every other row i make a bed between rows of corn plants, this year i interplanted gaspe flint between mesquakie
Don't forget, the sun is heating up slowly and inexoriably. Not just heating up, but also growing in diameter. By itself, that means the sun is getting closer, and, getting hotter. But also! Very slightly because space is not empty, it has dust and gas in it. And that slows the Earth down. Just a teency bit, but that means Earth's orbit is getting a wee bit smaller all the time. Which means Earth is getting closer to the sun. So, we have... A)Sun gets bigger means sun is getting closer to earth. B)Earth orbit gets smaller means earth is getting closer to sun. C)Sun is getting hotter all the time. ok... Sun's lifespan is 10 billion years before it goes poof and turns into a beautiful planetary nebula. Right now our sun is just over 5 billion years old, actually, 5,200,000,000 years old. In 700 million more years, the sun will noticeably expand. Only about 5% wider than now. It'll do that slowly but increasing the expansion rate over time. By then, Earth will become too hot to live on. By the time 2 billion years have passed, not even viruses coukl live on Earth. The sun's diameter will be the same as Mercury's orbit. By the time the sun is 9 billion years old, Earth will be in the sun's atmosphere, and will basically be a large meteor falling into the big huge bloated sun. Meantime, Andromeda galaxy will be in process of merging the milky way into it. Almost simultaneously, the helium which had been fusing in the sun making it so much hotter than it is now, will run out. The sun cools some because it can't ignite the carbon into fusion. So...the sun suddenly shrinks and kind of explodes, but no, not a supernova. Just a big poof. But ya know, the present pleistocene ice age interstitial is much more an effect of atmospheric gasses than of slowly changing solar energy inputs and flux variations combined with distance gradients. These have historic precedence, such as the mid-cenozoic thermal maximums. Also, geologic conditions can have great effect, such as the miocene's messinian saline crisis when colliding plates closed the gibraltor strait, turning the mediterranean into 2 or 3 small lakes, creating a huge basin that makes death valley seem like a little vale by comparison. Large tracts of dry superhot land, some almost 2 miles below sea level. that was only 14 million years ago. Apes without tails were the newest thing, but almost no animals went down to those salt flats. It was like to be 155 degrees in the shade, if there was any shade down there 6,500 feet below sea level. And what plants?
 

Scott Hucker

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Hello ,

My grandmother was mikmak from Gesgapegiag ''Gaspésie in French'' ''Gaspe in English'' so I'm interested by all native american heritage seeds :)

The history of Gaspe Flint maize: Jacques Cartier observed fields of it in 1534 (Gaspe, QC,CA) and it was and still is one of the earliest maturing corns, ripening in just 45-60 days. The plants are short, growing to about 2 ½ feet tall and the cobs barely reach 4" long. I was surprised how quickly it ripened for me this year and it certainly is worth growing in short season climates. The dried kernels can be soaked and then used in soups and stews. I am very happy to be able to preserve and offer this rare historic corn to my customers.(45-60 days maturity)


Regards!!

Mathieu Pelletier
Ste-Anne-des-Monts, Gesgapegiag, Quebec,CA
Hello,

Are there family legends describing the traditional fields of Gaspe? I have grown it 3 season.... and have feared letting anything climb on it via 3 sister. I have wondered, in that area, are there mud flats or river areas that created a rich planting bed where Gaspe was sown more densely, like rice?

For two seasons, I planted closely, 9” by 9” pattern. I have been pleased with the result.

Scott
 

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