I want a pair of goats

Collector

Garden Master
Joined
Sep 16, 2010
Messages
3,007
Reaction score
3,692
Points
337
Location
Eastern Wa. Zone 5/6 ?
If it can keep a raccoon out it should be able to keep a goat in.
Lol, it sounds like the story about the rancher who decided to rope a deer at cattle feeder. What could possibly go wrong.
I have a neighbor lady who raises milk goats and seeks the milk ,soap, and lotions from the milk. I talked to her about getting goats a year or so back, she informed me that the younger goats are usually the troublemakers. And once they get some age they settle down some. We still haven’t decided weather or not to get goats. This may be the thread to watch to help decide.
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
7,773
Reaction score
8,259
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
Glad to hear that! BUT, I don't want milk or meat from these goats, just their ability to mow. Guess they will fall in the category of "pets."
We have already pre-named them, "Gin" and "Tonic,"
That's what I was looking at when I responded earlier. Two wethers sounds like your best bet.

They ALL say, that they can't have other animals, but I can have anything I want, bc I do all of the grunt work.

Reminds me of a story. @Collector might appreciate it. My wife wanted to get a milk goat. I knew her plan, she'd get her milk goat and I'd do all the work. So I told her that I'd build the facilities, even told her which building I'd put the milking bay in. An electric outlet was right there, an electric fence against coyotes and dogs wasn't a problem. But she'd need to help her friend with her goats every day once a day for a month. She'd need to learn how she was going to take care of her goat, including milking. She had no clue what kind of a commitment twice a day milking is. That was the last I heard about getting a goat.

I don't see two wethers being that much different than two gelded horses if you take care of escape issues and consider their vulnerability to coyotes or maybe dogs.
 

Messybun

Chillin' In The Garden
Joined
Dec 8, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
45
Points
33
Hello there. I have Pygmy goats. First off, I love mine. But they are a pain in the bud lol. You never want to picket a goat, they will go insane or break it. Some goats will even strangle themselves. There is such thing as movable fencing, I know a lot of people love electric fences. I don’t. But you can use cattle panels, I’ve seen some people even put them on wheels. Keep in mind that goats are browsers, not grazers. So a goat will naturally prefer the tops of tall weeds, bark, vines, and exactly everything you don’t want them to eat. Goats also love to jump on things, and love to play. Make sure you are prepared for their destructive behaviors😆. Get at least 4 ft. Fencing, even pygmies can trample it.
It sounds like your garden is a lovely place, sometimes fencing can be an eye sore, so keep that in mind. Good luck with whatever you choose!
 

digitS'

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
21,358
Reaction score
13,442
Points
457
Location
border, ID/WA(!)
Since we may be able to think that we are talking to @Collector , I will comment on goat milk.

I was a little disappointed in it. Perfectly fine until it was a few hours old. Then, I could taste "goat." Earlier, it was just very sweet. I learned to use it quickly, like for breakfast - warm, even! It was fine.

Much of it went to the critters. Of course, the cats nearly lived on it but I also fed it to the dogs. And, it went to the chickens which I thought was a priority because I had this little scheme that it would be an important part of their diets. Problem was, the dogs & chickens couldn't handle so much milk in their diets - loose bowels!

I made cheese but not for me - for the critters. It amounted to nothing more than pouring the milk into a big, shallow pan, adding rennet, and leaving it on the kitchen counter for 12 hours. I could cut it up and pour off the whey (for the compost). THIS was my critter food!

No more problem for the dogs (altho they didn't get all that much of it). The chickens did just what I'd hoped and with milk (cheese) an important part of their diet - they produced eggs like crazy. I don't remember what percentage it amounted to, this was almost 50 years ago. I bought wheat from a neighbor and didn't have very many chickens - wasn't really trying to raise them for meat. It also helped that the dogs were fairly small and they had dry dog food. Still, I was going through a lot of milk. It did seem that I was doing a lot of "goat work" for a lot of eggs and as a benefit for cats & dogs. I was okay with it for awhile.

Oh, and goat meat - I had a fair amount of it from the offspring of 2 milk goats. It tasted like duck to me - first to last, always did. I like the flavor of duck meat.

Steve
 

Marie2020

Deeply Rooted
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
1,097
Reaction score
1,735
Points
175
Here is the deer story I was referring to. A lot of you may have already heard it or read it. It is a real fun story.
I've never laughed at a human getting so hurt before but this story really got to me :lol:😂

Thank you so much for this incredibly funny story . Still laughing 😂:lol: :clap
 
6

6884

Guest
Things i found out very quickly when i became a goat owner.....

They are like rambunctious kids, love to play, and do things they know ticks you off. Fencing, make it pig tight and bull strong. Disbud or buy polled stock, I will never own another goat with horns. They are dangerous even when they are not trying to hurt you, plus bucks naturally rub their horns up and down everything, very destructive when they do this.

Both of my bucks are in tack so when the does come in heat, quite naturally it's a battle royal, but they are pen mates, and will fight like crazy for 10 minutes, then they are the best of buds again. My does are bred now so they haven't been in heat since December, but the bucks still "show off" when they see a doe, or when one comes near the fence. Don't think they wont head butt you if you get in their way of something they want, food, doe, or trying to get out the gate, and the smell.....boy howdy do they stink when they put on their perfume Lol.

With all that being said, I will have more soon, the few that I have taught me how to best care for them, and what and what not to do. I have both Pygmy and Dwarf Nigerian, by far the Nigerians are smaller and more kid and people friendly, but the Pygmies are very, very smart and will outsmart you if you let them. They are a lot of fun, but they do need attention and you have to be more hands on with things like worming, hoof trimming, washing, just more general maintenance then some animals.


This is Butter bean, he is a dwarf nigerian, real gentle and calm natured. He was a bottle baby.
2.jpg
 

thistlebloom

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
16,476
Reaction score
17,296
Points
457
Location
North Idaho 48th parallel
Things i found out very quickly when i became a goat owner.....

They are like rambunctious kids, love to play, and do things they know ticks you off. Fencing, make it pig tight and bull strong. Disbud or buy polled stock, I will never own another goat with horns. They are dangerous even when they are not trying to hurt you, plus bucks naturally rub their horns up and down everything, very destructive when they do this.

Both of my bucks are in tack so when the does come in heat, quite naturally it's a battle royal, but they are pen mates, and will fight like crazy for 10 minutes, then they are the best of buds again. My does are bred now so they haven't been in heat since December, but the bucks still "show off" when they see a doe, or when one comes near the fence. Don't think they wont head butt you if you get in their way of something they want, food, doe, or trying to get out the gate, and the smell.....boy howdy do they stink when they put on their perfume Lol.

With all that being said, I will have more soon, the few that I have taught me how to best care for them, and what and what not to do. I have both Pygmy and Dwarf Nigerian, by far the Nigerians are smaller and more kid and people friendly, but the Pygmies are very, very smart and will outsmart you if you let them. They are a lot of fun, but they do need attention and you have to be more hands on with things like worming, hoof trimming, washing, just more general maintenance then some animals.


This is Butter bean, he is a dwarf nigerian, real gentle and calm natured. He was a bottle baby.
View attachment 39532

And what's the goats name?
 

thistlebloom

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
16,476
Reaction score
17,296
Points
457
Location
North Idaho 48th parallel
I don't know if it's been mentioned but goats also love tree bark, and everything else trees produce, so protect any trees that may be in their pasture. Electric fencing will work well to keep them from destroying fence, which they love to climb and rub the length of their bodies on.
I guess the size of the goat breed comes into play a little more when you're discussing destruction.

We found cattle panels make good goat fence. Sturdy enough to be stood on and rubbed, so if you need a night pen, or place to keep them off the pastures for whatever reason, CP would get my vote.

I love goats, they're comical and personable mostly. Especially if they were bottle babies.
 
Top