Nawthern vs Southern

flowerbug

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Hahaha!!! It looks like it would cause a nasty RASH!!!
you've heard the expression "Road Rash" from a motorcycle wipeout? well that can happen if you go skiing on crusty snow without good enough protection. also tripping and falling through an ice sheet over any body of water can cut you. i have scars. :( i survived. :)

oh and just in case you ever go ice-skating with someone do not jump after them when they go flying over/into a snowbank. that is how i lost 1/2 of one of my front teef.
 

ducks4you

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i feel real awful for all you northerners dealing with polar storm after storm, just to show i'm a good sport put on my cold weather attire..
View attachment 34065
68* with all windows open........:plbb
In 1898, was a polar vortex that went SO FAR SOUTH that Tallahassee registered -2 degrees F. That was February, 1898.
There is still time.
 

Carol Dee

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Exhibit B happened during a blizzard a few years ago to my school bus. I had a passenger door that never closed snuggly and any wind would work it open, YEP. Came to work to have to shovel it out. Up the step, on and under the driver set and dash. There was even snow blown into the console dials. What a MESS.
 

MinnesotaGardening

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Ooohhhhhh...Well then...shots fired! ;)

If any northerner didn't check the depth of the ice on a lake, or left their door/window/sunroof open in the snow, then that's their own fault. But it was probably a visiting southerner..I've seen them slip-sliding around on the roads because they never learned how to drive on ice and compacted snow...

I will take my climate any day. The snow crunches under your feet 1,000,000X better than dry leaves, and on the coldest nights it shimmers in the moonlight like sparkling diamonds. And how many southerners can grow my favorite perennial flowers, beautiful peonies and lilacs? They thrive with zero attention here...just another benefit of our -30 degree winters.

Currently my hardneck garlic (that's right, I'll get scapes!) is waiting patiently under a nice blanket of snow while I'm planning the rest of my garden indoors. And when spring gets here, I will get to plant my lettuce and spinach along with everything else because my summer doesn't turn them into premature flowers. That means I'll get to eat my salad ingredients all together! And with a little preserving, I'm still eating from my garden year-round. I'm more than happy to enjoy a MN winter. You don't make me jealous with those green pictures, southerners are the ones who are missing out! We know what cold actually feels like and still enjoy it! :celebrate
 

seedcorn

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Ooohhhhhh...Well then...shots fired! ;)

If any northerner didn't check the depth of the ice on a lake, or left their door/window/sunroof open in the snow, then that's their own fault. But it was probably a visiting southerner..I've seen them slip-sliding around on the roads because they never learned how to drive on ice and compacted snow...

I will take my climate any day. The snow crunches under your feet 1,000,000X better than dry leaves, and on the coldest nights it shimmers in the moonlight like sparkling diamonds. And how many southerners can grow my favorite perennial flowers, beautiful peonies and lilacs? They thrive with zero attention here...just another benefit of our -30 degree winters.

Currently my hardneck garlic (that's right, I'll get scapes!) is waiting patiently under a nice blanket of snow while I'm planning the rest of my garden indoors. And when spring gets here, I will get to plant my lettuce and spinach along with everything else because my summer doesn't turn them into premature flowers. That means I'll get to eat my salad ingredients all together! And with a little preserving, I'm still eating from my garden year-round. I'm more than happy to enjoy a MN winter. You don't make me jealous with those green pictures, southerners are the ones who are missing out! We know what cold actually feels like and still enjoy it! :celebrate
Shush. Do not let them southerners know about the north.......next thing they will want to come up here. Think Iceland vs Greenland.

Up here, it is snow, cold, frigid. Nothing to do but pull yourself out of snow banks....... No one from the south moves up here. (Disregard my family history)
 

MinnesotaGardening

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Shush. Do not let them southerners know about the north.......next thing they will want to come up here. Think Iceland vs Greenland.

Up here, it is snow, cold, frigid. Nothing to do but pull yourself out of snow banks....... No one from the south moves up here. (Disregard my family history)
Oh yes, thats right....brrrrr. It's so cold. 😆
 

Dirtmechanic

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Ooohhhhhh...Well then...shots fired! ;)

If any northerner didn't check the depth of the ice on a lake, or left their door/window/sunroof open in the snow, then that's their own fault. But it was probably a visiting southerner..I've seen them slip-sliding around on the roads because they never learned how to drive on ice and compacted snow...

I will take my climate any day. The snow crunches under your feet 1,000,000X better than dry leaves, and on the coldest nights it shimmers in the moonlight like sparkling diamonds. And how many southerners can grow my favorite perennial flowers, beautiful peonies and lilacs? They thrive with zero attention here...just another benefit of our -30 degree winters.

Currently my hardneck garlic (that's right, I'll get scapes!) is waiting patiently under a nice blanket of snow while I'm planning the rest of my garden indoors. And when spring gets here, I will get to plant my lettuce and spinach along with everything else because my summer doesn't turn them into premature flowers. That means I'll get to eat my salad ingredients all together! And with a little preserving, I'm still eating from my garden year-round. I'm more than happy to enjoy a MN winter. You don't make me jealous with those green pictures, southerners are the ones who are missing out! We know what cold actually feels like and still enjoy it! :celebrate
Ooh you arent Nawthern, tho I know you wannabe. You are in the Northern Nawthern, interior or northwards. Where the crystallising moisture of a forest walk makes one consider fairies are making music at night. Where those very sounds make a Southerner swear they heard the Northern Lights sing. Oh that is another level of cold. Just ask Sam McGee:

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.

Now Sam McGee was from Tennessee, where the cotton blooms and blows.
Why he left his home in the South to roam 'round the Pole, God only knows.
He was always cold, but the land of gold seemed to hold him like a spell;
Though he'd often say in his homely way that "he'd sooner live in hell."

On a Christmas Day we were mushing our way over the Dawson trail.
Talk of your cold! through the parka's fold it stabbed like a driven nail.
If our eyes we'd close, then the lashes froze till sometimes we couldn't see;
It wasn't much fun, but the only one to whimper was Sam McGee.

And that very night, as we lay packed tight in our robes beneath the snow,
And the dogs were fed, and the stars o'erhead were dancing heel and toe,
He turned to me, and "Cap," says he, "I'll cash in this trip, I guess;
And if I do, I'm asking that you won't refuse my last request."

Well, he seemed so low that I couldn't say no; then he says with a sort of moan:
"It's the cursèd cold, and it's got right hold till I'm chilled clean through to the bone.
Yet 'tain't being dead—it's my awful dread of the icy grave that pains;
So I want you to swear that, foul or fair, you'll cremate my last remains."

A pal's last need is a thing to heed, so I swore I would not fail;
And we started on at the streak of dawn; but God! he looked ghastly pale.
He crouched on the sleigh, and he raved all day of his home in Tennessee;
And before nightfall a corpse was all that was left of Sam McGee.

There wasn't a breath in that land of death, and I hurried, horror-driven,
With a corpse half hid that I couldn't get rid, because of a promise given;
It was lashed to the sleigh, and it seemed to say: "You may tax your brawn and brains,
But you promised true, and it's up to you to cremate those last remains."

Now a promise made is a debt unpaid, and the trail has its own stern code.
In the days to come, though my lips were dumb, in my heart how I cursed that load.
In the long, long night, by the lone firelight, while the huskies, round in a ring,
Howled out their woes to the homeless snows— O God! how I loathed the thing.

And every day that quiet clay seemed to heavy and heavier grow;
And on I went, though the dogs were spent and the grub was getting low;
The trail was bad, and I felt half mad, but I swore I would not give in;
And I'd often sing to the hateful thing, and it hearkened with a grin.

Till I came to the marge of Lake Lebarge, and a derelict there lay;
It was jammed in the ice, but I saw in a trice it was called the "Alice May."
And I looked at it, and I thought a bit, and I looked at my frozen chum;
Then "Here," said I, with a sudden cry, "is my cre-ma-tor-eum."

Some planks I tore from the cabin floor, and I lit the boiler fire;
Some coal I found that was lying around, and I heaped the fuel higher;
The flames just soared, and the furnace roared—such a blaze you seldom see;
And I burrowed a hole in the glowing coal, and I stuffed in Sam McGee.

Then I made a hike, for I didn't like to hear him sizzle so;
And the heavens scowled, and the huskies howled, and the wind began to blow.
It was icy cold, but the hot sweat rolled down my cheeks, and I don't know why;
And the greasy smoke in an inky cloak went streaking down the sky.

I do not know how long in the snow I wrestled with grisly fear;
But the stars came out and they danced about ere again I ventured near;
I was sick with dread, but I bravely said: "I'll just take a peep inside.
I guess he's cooked, and it's time I looked"; ... then the door I opened wide.

And there sat Sam, looking cool and calm, in the heart of the furnace roar;
And he wore a smile you could see a mile, and he said: "Please close that door.
It's fine in here, but I greatly fear you'll let in the cold and storm—
Since I left Plumtree, down in Tennessee, it's the first time I've been warm."

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.
n/a
 
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