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Alasgun

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And on a different note; here’s what a batch of Lacto-bacillus serum looks like at the beginning. In less than a week it will be ready, a qt. of the actual serum will be saved off and used in a foliar spray solution; the remainder will be divided up and added to a 120 gal. batch of soil i’m preparing. As an “organic digester” it excels at breaking down all the amendments going into my best soils, making them “plant ready” with no nutrient burn what so ever!
 

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heirloomgal

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25 pounds for two cabbages, that's seriously impressive! Beautiful produce.

I think you're good to go with those seeds @Alasgun! Unlike carrots, they can't cross with the common weed Queen Anne's Lace (not sure if you have those in Alaska?) which is one of the banes of carrot seed saving. Even the recommended population for seed harvesting is pretty low, 6 to 20 plants. But even if you save seed from the one plant you might just be alright. They can get inbreeding depression, but not bad like carrots. I think it's worth a try! Maybe tuck some seeds into your Christmas cards as presents, since you'll probably never use all that you harvest! Parsnip seeds are famous for expiring quickly.
 

Alasgun

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Thanks, id read about having at least two for genetic diversity and in my case thats what i have, just by chance; because i missed two last fall. When i noticed them this spring i just lifted them and moved them over to the next bed, where Parsnips were going to be this year.
I guess after a sufficient drying period i can see if they’ll germinate?

My plan is to go thru this little jiration but to also buy seed this fall for next years Parsnips to be sure of a crop. If my own prove viable it will be easy for me to move a group of 6 or so over from bed to bed each year.
 

Alasgun

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After my wild prediction about the 25lb of cabbage I decided to plop them on the scale; out of curiosity and to be sure I’m not misleading anyone.
Phew; I was close enough! Now my conscious is clean and I’m off to Saturday morning Prayer breakfast and not wondering whether or not I lied to the good folks!👀
I’m cooking today so I better get after it.
 

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Alasgun

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And on a different note; here’s what a batch of Lacto-bacillus serum looks like at the beginning. In less than a week it will be ready, a qt. of the actual serum will be saved off and used in a foliar spray solution; the remainder will be divided up and added to a 120 gal. batch of soil i’m preparing. As an “organic digester” it excels at breaking down all the amendments going into my best soils, making them “plant ready” with no nutrient burn what so ever!
This batch is done and later today i’ll draw off a qt. Of the whey (serum) which will be kept refrigerated until used in foliar spray. Typically i’ll add 10cc to a qt bottle of water and spray all the foliage toward evening.

The remainder will be re-combined, equally divided and poured on the soil in the 32 gal Brute containers, where it will go to work breaking down (digesting) the amendment's.

Unlike chemical nutrients, organic amendments would be considered “slow release” and seem to be at they’re best after undergoing microbial activity. This batch of soil received a good dose of Compost tea (aerobic) at the start and with the addition of the Lacto (anaerobic), will have received the sum total of my very limited knowledge, on this subject!🙄

In another month that soil will be ready to use. I have kept these blended soil‘s for over a year before using and believe the longer “cooking time” improves the mix.
 

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Alasgun

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For anyone so inclined, i’ve attached a great link to walk you thru the process of making some Lacto for yourself! Having made and used this stuff for several years, i’ve tweaked the process to better suit my useage, for instance; i dont add sugar at the end because i keep it refrigerated and it will be gone in a couple months.
The author tells you to put the cheese in your compost pile or feed it to your animals etc. I will attest to the value as a Compost starter but have never fed it to anything, except the one time i tried it.
It’s touted uses are many; i use it as an “Organic digester” and as a foliar spray and cant say enough good about it. They also talk about it as an odor eliminator; which i thought was funny as it smells like baby puke! But on the one occasion i tried it, it did a very good job neutralizing a stinky drain!
We use whole milk but 2% works fine too and seems a bit quicker. You’ll notice the “authors” jars seem to have more complete separation than mine; that’s the difference you’ll see between 2% and whole milk.
And if you try this, it’s not rocket science. Play with it a bit and learn the value for yourself.
p.s, just focus on the article and not the fact a stoner put this together.
i believe he just plagiarized this as i find the same info numerous places; i used this one because he’s got the best pictures!

 
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Alasgun

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Before moving on i want to show you how this all ends. I prefer using gallon jars because it makes this part easier. (remember how lazy i am?)
Those screen lids shown in the article plug up immediately and make straining the cheese real messy.
Cut the cheese and use a slotted spoon, it’s much simpler. In this instance i saved off 2 qt’s for foliar application, 2 qt’s for my buddy’s fish carcass drum and the remainder went on the soil.
Once a year i’ll make a batch and dump it down the septic And have had zero problems after 30 years!
 

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Alasgun

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With our “nothing leaves the farm” mindset; everything gets a turn in a compost bin or a garden bed etc, and over the years we’ve had a very few violas here or there. Always pretty, never in the way; they’ve always been welcome.
This year they came up everywhere, i never would have thought “invasive species” and Viola at the same time. The trip thru the compost bin made them a bit Jurassic with stems 1/4 in thick and reaching 18 inches tall. This wad was pulled out of some strawberries and i’ve already been taking some there each day when i give Rabbits a morning treat.
 

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Dahlia

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Nasturtiums and Lupines! Both about shot but supporting one another for just a bit longer; kinda like me an Ruthy😊
Did you ever eat your nasturtium flowers sprinkled on a salad or even better - on ice cream? I've heard you can eat those!
 

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