Solving the Squash Bug dilemma...for good!

ducks4you

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If you purchase vet wrap and don't use it all, store it in a ziplock bag. (35 years as a horse owner and vet wrap user), and it WILL dry out on you. It's handy if your kitty scratches you nasty, and you can bandage yourself up and cover the whole thing. DD did that a year ago, and went to court with a hot pink bandage on her hand.
 

catjac1975

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I never have weeds and my chickens are in the garden all fall and winter but my squash bug population last year was in the millions, I'm sure of it.

This year I'm just starting to see some and eggs on the leaves....but I've been putting the ducks in the garden come evening, leaving them overnight and through the morning of the next day these last two days. Definitely see them working the squash plants and also picking the bugs off my broccoli...got some kind of flea beetle working there. Haven't seen a single JB in the garden yet, though I saw a few on the zinnias in the front flower bed.

We'll see how the Ducks of Wrath help with the SB population. Vine borers I've been able to prevent with the use of vet wrap around the stems of my seedlings and removing it once the stems are tough and large.
The ducks don't eat your plants?
 

Beekissed

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The ducks don't eat your plants?
They will if they are tender seedlings and they will nibble on any plants near their watering tub....seems ducks like to nibble vegetation, no matter what it is, near their water source. I got smart about that and now place their watering tub near vegetation that NEED nibbled, like that lemon balm that has regrown to a 3x3 plant once again, after me trimming it down to 1x1. Or I'll place it near some little bunches of ladino clover that have popped up in the garden. I had made the mistake of placing it far from any veggies, so they just strolled over and ate a few of my pepper plants...they were the closest thing, though still a good 5 ft away.

Tender seedlings are easily protected by a low netting fence and push in stakes, as the ducks will not try to fly over it or go under it like chickens will.

In eating the squash bug eggs, some of the leaves and stems of the squash get torn up or trampled, but I can already see new stems and leaves forming to replace the old, which isn't such a bad thing, I don't think. I'd rather have those eggs eaten than left behind to produce more bugs. For that purpose, I planted several sacrifice squash plants in the garden, both for squash bug collection and also the squash borers(I didn't protect the stems with vet wrap on those squash).

The worst they can do is trample things...their feet are wide and webbed, so repeated walking over things like bean vines or cuke vines can be avoided by trellising these things well. Mine like to walk the fence, so planting anything too near the fence has proven problematic....my garlic got trampled and a few nasturtiums and beans. They will recover but still good to note to move those closer into the garden next season.
 

Redd Tornado

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If you purchase vet wrap and don't use it all, store it in a ziplock bag. (35 years as a horse owner and vet wrap user), and it WILL dry out on you. It's handy if your kitty scratches you nasty, and you can bandage yourself up and cover the whole thing. DD did that a year ago, and went to court with a hot pink bandage on her hand.
Thanks. GTK vet wrap comes in fashionable colors to go with any outfit.
 

catjac1975

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They will if they are tender seedlings and they will nibble on any plants near their watering tub....seems ducks like to nibble vegetation, no matter what it is, near their water source. I got smart about that and now place their watering tub near vegetation that NEED nibbled, like that lemon balm that has regrown to a 3x3 plant once again, after me trimming it down to 1x1. Or I'll place it near some little bunches of ladino clover that have popped up in the garden. I had made the mistake of placing it far from any veggies, so they just strolled over and ate a few of my pepper plants...they were the closest thing, though still a good 5 ft away.

Tender seedlings are easily protected by a low netting fence and push in stakes, as the ducks will not try to fly over it or go under it like chickens will.

In eating the squash bug eggs, some of the leaves and stems of the squash get torn up or trampled, but I can already see new stems and leaves forming to replace the old, which isn't such a bad thing, I don't think. I'd rather have those eggs eaten than left behind to produce more bugs. For that purpose, I planted several sacrifice squash plants in the garden, both for squash bug collection and also the squash borers(I didn't protect the stems with vet wrap on those squash).

The worst they can do is trample things...their feet are wide and webbed, so repeated walking over things like bean vines or cuke vines can be avoided by trellising these things well. Mine like to walk the fence, so planting anything too near the fence has proven problematic....my garlic got trampled and a few nasturtiums and beans. They will recover but still good to note to move those closer into the garden next season.
Sounds like a bit of a trial but, fun.
 

Beekissed

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Sounds like a bit of a trial but, fun.
I just plant enough that, when something gets trampled, I have enough still left for our consumption. It's working out GREAT....I haven't seen a single squash bug since I first saw them and have been putting the ducks in the garden. The Jap Beetles have arrived and are working on the apple tree right outside the garden but they seem to be avoiding the garden itself....wonder why....

:D
 

flowerbug

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I just plant enough that, when something gets trampled, I have enough still left for our consumption. It's working out GREAT....I haven't seen a single squash bug since I first saw them and have been putting the ducks in the garden. The Jap Beetles have arrived and are working on the apple tree right outside the garden but they seem to be avoiding the garden itself....wonder why....

:D
i see some ramps and a temporary net around that tree in the near future... :) one thing i do like about JB's is that they are calm enough in the morning that you can often hand pick them off plants. if you go out with a container of water to drop them in (or to knock them in if they're in a group where you can do that) then you can toss them all to the ducks when you're done. :) *crunch crunch*
 

so lucky

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My teenage chickens are discovering the thrill of Japanese beetles. JBs aren't terrible this year, but I see a few every morning on the roses.
 

Ridgerunner

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if you go out with a container of water to drop them in (or to knock them in if they're in a group where you can do that) then you can toss them all to the ducks when you're done. :) *crunch crunch*
When I use a bucket of water to collect Japanese Beetles or June Bugs I put a drop or two of dish washing liquid in it to break the surface tension so they sink better. That never hurt my chickens when they ate them.
 
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