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stubbed toes and mud pies

Discussion in 'About Me & My Garden' started by flowerbug, Nov 16, 2017.

  1. Dec 2, 2018
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    you got them before they could make more, but they always make more outside, which is why i just want to plug the gaps i can find. i'd leave them alone outside if they never got in the walls of the house any more.

    they don't really do much damage to the things we grow. they may chew on a few beans or peas here or there but they don't eat onions, peppers or tomatoes that i've noticed.

    i've not been growing grains since one experiment with wheat and rye (which was fun and i wish i could do more winter cover crops again, but Mom hated what happened with the chipmunks moving seeds around).

    fungus gnats will look like pepper on the snow here when i walk in the woods in the fall or in the spring.

    i'm learning more about mouse habits by watching mouse trap vids where people set up cameras to watch the traps.

    i've yet to get any answer about how long a mouse will live in a wall without access to food and water.

    so far i've got six mice. i'm guessing i have at least four more in this tribe to capture. i don't know yet if i've gotten the ones that have been in the wall and i haven't found the gap they are using...
     
  2. Dec 2, 2018
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    i want to get rid of this huge pile of mouse/chipmunk habitat which is
    right next to the house, but Mom won't do it...

    we call it The Berm. it was put in place to block the view from the SW. a big pile of sand and then topped with black plastic, rocks and a few trees planted on it. now the trees are getting too big and i don't like them being too close to the house and the big pile of rocks is a haven to any critter that wants to nest under the rocks and in those spots that have been dug/chewed through the black plastic.

    the usual tracks i find in the snow are from The Berm along the foundation and then around the entrance to the crawl space and then behind the AC unit. it's a highway. almost all of the mice i catch are in the traps i put behind the AC unit or near there. otherwise there's a 10-30ft layer of crushed rinsed limestone the mice have to run across to get to the house from any of the surrounding garden spaces.

    we saw yet another semi-feral kitty (or another of the neighbor's kitties) the other day. hope they get some mice or rabbits when they come through. in the past few months this makes it the fourth kitty we've seen come along.
     
  3. Dec 2, 2018
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    In the hoop house, what I thought might be true about mice was all but verified ..

    . After I had caught several with a trap in what I bet was just the right location -- no more caught!

    Instead, there was dirt on the trap. I got the dirt off. Then, there was dirt again! New trap. SNAP! They show contempt for smelly old traps by scratching dirt on them. I put used traps in bleach water for a few days, then rinse.

    Steve
     
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  4. Dec 2, 2018
    murphysranch

    murphysranch Garden Addicted

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    DD programs in Ruby on Rails at HP. She also is adept at Python.

    Where I last worked in 2009, the programmers were forced to use Fox Pro. Old and outdated!
     
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  5. Dec 2, 2018
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    they can scent mark things to mark territory, but as of yet i have had no problems with dirty traps catching mice on the highway here. i won't describe what happened the other day, but as of yet no amount of gross deters them as far as i can tell.

    i've caught mice for three months on an empty trap with just the smell of peanut butter on it (in the car where the rains could not get at it). they're very curious and have a very keen sense of smell.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2018
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    i'm not adept at Python yet, but having worked with computers as long as i have it usually isn't too hard for me to figure things out. as what i'm doing now is all for fun there's no pressure or schedule.

    i remember Fox Pro but i never had to use it for anything.

    people can still make a living writing COBOL so hey, if they're happy and doing needed work it's all fine with me. i'm glad i don't have to do that, i can read/write COBOL but i wouldn't consider myself an expert at it. same with a bunch of languages...
     
  7. Dec 10, 2018 at 1:20 PM
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    the mouse traps have finally (i hope) gotten the culprit. the past three days no new mice have been caught and i've not heard any more chewing in the wall. i sure hope so. i still have not found the way they are getting in the wall to begin with. i have my suspect places, but don't have a boroscope to be able to see for sure what is up. it's complicated... :)

    the last mouse i caught was on the small side so it could have been going through some wire mesh i have put on (which prevents me from easily feeling around inside further and why i would need a scope to see better in there). the wire mesh is cemented in place at the end of a pile of cemented sandstones used to make steps for the patio door to my room. the steps are also over a vent from the basement so when they built the steps and cemented them in place they made a tunnel for the air to go in and out. they did not make sure the area around the vent was sealed up properly and so after a few rounds of mice getting in through there i did put the wire mesh on and cemented it in place. now it may be that i should get some finer wire mesh and put it on there. i may even have some if i can find it (i hate it when we reorganise the garage :) )...

    in other news the game/program is getting very close to version 1. :) i need to do some distribution/setup/dependency things and then put it out there further, but it's gone along well the past few weeks as i've had time/energy to poke at it.

    family news... ugh... pass.
     
  8. Dec 10, 2018 at 4:16 PM
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    Flowerbug, I was tempted to post some quotes by linguists essentially explaining (for the umpteenth time, I'm sure) the difference between a linguist and a polyglot. Of course, you were not talking about those languages. Good for you being able to use programming ones with purpose.

    It sounds like you might almost enjoy living in a house 120 years old like mine with your curiosity about what is going on inside the walls. Or, is that just frustration ;)?

    Although it's still small, this house was built in 3 parts. I'm fairly sure that there was a kitchen fire that prompted a rebuilding of that area at what might have been at a very early date. It allowed for a new basement. Before that, access to a cellar was through the floor in what was then the dining room. That room is now a bedroom and the cellar is a room in the basement where I store roots and such from the garden.

    Next came an extension to the utility room taking out the earlier backdoor. That extension also includes a second bedroom. We had only one child at home when we moved here and the previous owners were a childless couple. They are responsible for this addition after, I guess, living in a one-bedroom house for about 30 years.

    I was on one archeological dig in my academic career and don't count myself as a digger. Maybe that's why it took me over 10 years to discover the old access to the cellar :).

    Waste water etc. runs in a pipe to the front of the house and probably has for many years. Honestly, I don't think I can bring myself to locating the "backhouse" and excavating there :rolleyes:. It's absolutely a sure bet that it is somewhere out there but I didn't come across evidence while digging for the greenhouse foundation.

    Ya know, those locations can hold treasure troves from antiquity ;).

    Steve
     
  9. Dec 10, 2018 at 10:49 PM
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    this house was built in '96 so about 22+yrs old. frustration for sure... and a desire to know what is going on/where they are getting in.

    i did have an archaeology class in college, but it had no field work aspect at all. that said me and a friend enjoyed digging for old bottles (he would also go diving for them and i would man the boat up top for him). funny that as i'm eyeing that bottle collection for getting rid of it since i have done nothing with it other than keep moving it around. so it is also a dust collection too.

    as for computer languages, i've always been very good at practical aspects of programming but some parts of the theory were difficult for me (dyslexia and mathematical symbol interpretations just don't go very well together) to pick up. formulas i can only learn very slowly.

    i did try to learn German one time but gave up after a few weeks. i had so much rote memorization going on at that time that adding yet another class of it was too much. "ich bin crank" summed it up nicely.

    and old houses with strange levels or basements i've seen in many places already and almost bought one when i was in TN but i talked myself out of it. good thing too. it was an old cabin that was upgraded, but was still not finished, it had some nice aspects like having 22acres and an uphill area with a natural spring for a water supply, but it also had a lot of things that would have taken $$ to fix so i had to make a low offer. they didn't accept it and i wouldn't come up further. like i said, good thing... it saved me a lot of headaches i'm sure. :) the year after i made the offer they had a very heavy snow followed by heavy rains and the road and bridges were washed out in that area and some fatalities from people driving into rivers not noticing that the bridges had been washed out.

    one other fun part of that place was the plumbing went into a cesspit and that may be what you are hinting at too... would have been fun to get that fixed.

    i've never had to excavate an old outhouse pit for any reason. i think it would be fun to do old basements/cellars and me and the one friend mentioned above did some hunting to try to find some but we never actually did find any we could dig.

    now a days they have those ground radar thingies that can help find historical sites. if you had gold in them thar hills you'd find people nosing about...
     

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