Tomatoes 2021

seedcorn

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Date and germination % is very important as they should be within 6-8 months of when they will be planted. IF they are wrong, there are state laws they have broken-& penalties. Worst offenders are mom/pop places that sell bulk seed. Never know how old or if they blended last years seed into this years seed-you know they will not throw away seed they didn't sell.
Temperature in storing seed is almost a non factor on germination. Wild temperature swings and moisture are killers. Freezing seed can cause ice crystals and ruin seed. Best way is low humidity and stable temperatures.
 

ducks4you

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The method of obtaining tomato seeds may also have an impact on bad germination. Large amounts of seeds are obtained by fermentation. Once upon a time, I tried this method. Lots of seeds germinated in the cups during the process. Seeds that have been awakened and then dried will no longer sprout.
THAT is fascinating. What should we do, remove, dry out and separate seeds?
When I did that with the last pumpkin THIS WINTER, I dropped a few seeds in the process into a pot. They are now ready to transplant, so quite viable.
I have never MADE the time to ferment. I would love to do less work and get great results. :D
 

Zeedman

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Fermentation is a great way to process tomato seed in large numbers, but the process does need to be watched closely. Temperature, and to a lesser extent variety, can influence the tendency to sprout. I've lost a few batches if I let them go a day or two too long. For me, fermentation usually takes 2-3 days, or a little longer under cool conditions. I stir the containers daily, and check a few seeds... if most of the membranes have separated from the seeds, they are ready. I say "most" of the membranes because if you wait for all of them to separate, the seeds may begin to sprout. A good brisk stirring with a wire whisk will break loose any remaining membranes or debris, after which they can be cleaned & dried. There are more detailed descriptions of fermentation & alternative methods for saving tomato seed in the "plant propagation" sub-forum.

I should point out that if you do not want to use fermentation, you can still clean quite a few seeds by placing them in a tall container of water, beating vigorously with a wire whisk, then floating off debris by the same method used for fermentation. The primary advantage of fermentation vs. most other methods is that it can eliminate some seed-borne diseases.
 

heirloomgal

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The smallest tomato in the world! The 'Micro Tom'. It was released by the University of Florida in 1989. These little guys have been really good, sturdy little growers. Growing to only 6 inches, they are already setting blooms and ready to make some fruit. I'm growing them mostly because I like to try new and unusual things. Probably won't have fantastic taste, few dwarfs seems to, but I'm sure it'll make up for it in cuteness. We'll see how productive it is; I've tried Hahms Gelbe, Yellow Canary and Florida Petite (all under 12 inches) and they were all very productive considering their small size.


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Alasgun

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While i’ve not grown them, the golden hat micro dwarf’s ARE suppose to have great flavor. I was gifted a half dozen seeds earlier but have no more room; even for an under 1 ft tall plant in the greenhouse.

i re-gifted them and know where a pair of them went so i can follow up once we see how they do.
 

digitS'

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My New Big Dwarf trial was rather unfair ;).

First I have to admit that I have problems with names, now and then. Apparently, DW does, too. Example: whenever she hears the name Bloody Butcher tomato, she has the same response, "that's not very nice." So, we call that one Jolly Rancher ;).

New Big Dwarf is over 100 years old, we are told. How can it be New? How can it be both Big and a Dwarf? (Well, it is fruit-size that is big for the little plants.)

The worst thing was me setting them out near lawn grass. This was how I learned the local reality that slugs like to hang out near the garden in the lawn!

Sweet Baby Girls were among the smallest plants that I have grown, although Kimberley might have been smaller.

Steve
 

Pulsegleaner

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My New Big Dwarf trial was rather unfair ;).

First I have to admit that I have problems with names, now and then. Apparently, DW does, too. Example: whenever she hears the name Bloody Butcher tomato, she has the same response, "that's not very nice." So, we call that one Jolly Rancher ;).


Steve
Whereas I would always have to include the word "tomato" with that one, since there is also an heirloom dent corn called Bloody Butcher (a couple of them, in fact)

Which reminds me of my cousin who often brags of his "Garden full of Hookers" (Hookers is a yellow white and blue sweet corn.)

Or my plan that, if I could ever breed a black tomato with the peach fuzz skin trait, I was going to name it Cassia's Hairball, in honor of my (now former) cat.
 
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