What Did You Do In The Garden?

Zeedman

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I finally bought a new data cable for the new Note, so can post photos again. These are photos of this year's garlic: 20210716_202226.jpg 20210716_202245.jpg
Carpati, Artichoke type
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Dubna Standard, and Estonian Red (both marbled purple stripe types)
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Ron's Single Center (Artichoke type) and the "volunteer" Porcelain type (probably Georgian Fire)
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Special Idaho (Rocambole type) consistently one of the largest bulbs year after year
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Vic's (Rocambole type)

Obviously not as clean yet as I would like, having been harvested in wet ground. :hide The photos were taken today just before sunset, which apparently gave them the bluish tint. All varieties began with 2 bulbs, except for the unknown Porcelain (which had a lot of cloves). That one really sized up, given that the cloves planted were much smaller than normal... it should (hopefully) size up further next year. Carpati & Special Idaho are the highest yielding, and would be my choices if I could grow only two.

The remaining two varieties (German White and Krasnodar Red) began with only a few large cloves, and are still in the garden. All I'm really hoping for from them is an increase to plant for next year, and a few of the smaller cloves to eat.
 

ninnymary

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Corn doing A-okay, I think. This might be a good strong B:

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I think that I’m standing right beside one of @ninnymary ’s Petit Gris de Rennes melons. It seems that it went into the middle of this bed. I won’t be venturing into those vines to find the plant marker ;). Petit Gris de Rennes seemed to also be somewhat of a petit vine. The other 2 melon varieties are doing just fine, as well! Really pleased how happy the melons are with this weather :).

These winter squash vines also seem happy, Buttercup and Cha Ca Kabocha. Looks like another good winter squash year:

View attachment 42255
And no, I’m not venturing into those to either learn which is which or to pull that pigweed! Maybe, I can get some of that purslane and quake grass around the perimeter ;).

Pulled weeds in the zucchini and celery root for over an hour. By then, decided that the neighbors would tolerate the distant sound of the tiller so I beat up some purslane in a few paths 💪 .

Steve
I'm trellising my Petit de Gris this year. So far doing well but I think I should have planted more of them.
 

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Ridgerunner

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I read that Petit de Gris is a cantaloupe. One way to tell that a cantaloupe is ripe is the stem easily separates from the melon. I haven't grown Petit de Gris myself so I have no direct experience but you might want to support a melon that's off the ground so it doesn't fall off when it gets ripe. I've seen people support them in slings. Maybe someone that has grown it has insight.

I like the idea of a melon up off of the ground. That way they don't discolor, rot or get buggy where they touch the ground if if sets in wet.
 

Zeedman

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I read that Petit de Gris is a cantaloupe. One way to tell that a cantaloupe is ripe is the stem easily separates from the melon. I haven't grown Petit de Gris myself so I have no direct experience but you might want to support a melon that's off the ground so it doesn't fall off when it gets ripe. I've seen people support them in slings. Maybe someone that has grown it has insight.

I like the idea of a melon up off of the ground. That way they don't discolor, rot or get buggy where they touch the ground if if sets in wet.
Slings would be my recommendation as well, even if it were a melon that doesn't slip when ripe. The weight of the melon could suddenly pull down the vines, especially if rain or wind puts extra strain on them. That could potentially break the melon and/or kill the vines. :( I use slings when I trellis squash for the same reason (as I did with Tromboncino last year). I couldn't see what type of trellis is being used, but you need a strong anchor point for the sling.
 

Zeedman

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Harvested the last two garlic varieties yesterday. There are still 6 plants remaining in the bed (one of each hard neck variety) to allow bulbils to mature. Those bulbils will be planted in a separate, sheltered location at home. They take a year or two to enlarge, at which point they will become the new planting stock.
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German White (top, porcelain type) and Krasnodar Red (bottom, marbled purple stripe type). There was only one bulb of Krasnodar Red to start with.

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Okra is blooming, should have the first pods in about a week.

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Gretel eggplant is covered in blooms, and clusters of fruit are already forming. The bumbles are very busy on the blossoms. This variety does much better in pots than it does in the ground, perhaps it was bred for that.

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The Painted Mountain corn (thank you @baymule !) is healthy & tassling. A few stalks were knocked down by the recent round of storms, but are slowly righting themselves.
 

digitS'

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The air quality went to "good," although smoke is still obvious. Off we went to harvest some things in the garden and do a little weeding.

The broccoli has new leaves without much flea beetle damage. Yay! After the stellar 2020 broccoli year, it was a little surprising to see it have so much trouble. Quite disappointing especially with a commitment of 45' of row. With weeds again out of the way, I'll put fertilizer on it next time and hill up around each plant. Then, see what kinda crop it has in the fall.

Brought home what will probably be the last of the peas -- poor, miserable things. Probably should have just pulled them after the first episode of extreme heat. I have failed before with bush beans planted in late July but some ground should be available on the next visit.

More new potatoes and a few beans picked from the spring planting came home. DW is dicing up the Tokyo White onions right now. Freezing them works fine! The Italian chard may be developing a heavy stem, just as I do NOT prefer. It's still okay, though.

Steve
 

flowerbug

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lifted the garlic this morning, got the bigger bulbs cleaned up without resorting to using the hose to rinse them off. all the smaller bulbs i did use the hose on and then spread everything out to dry on the thyme along the edge.

this afternoon i was sitting here and heard some raindrops on the roof so i ran out and got the garlic put into buckets and box tops and brought into the garage so it can continue drying.

having it arranged along the edge where i could reach it from the gravel made it so easy to pick up and put in the buckets and no, i didn't really plan that but i love how it worked out.

pics eventually... :)

my brother and his friend took some of the early rejects that i would not want to risk putting into storage later. i have other rejects i'll have to bury deeply someplace where they'll not be disturbed (signs of rot issues i don't want to spread around) or probably better off to have the worms eat them and that usually transforms any kind of garlic or onion scrap into great future veggies.
 
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