One Alaskans greenhouse

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
16,053
Reaction score
24,170
Points
417
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
your local birds are probably carrying some diseases but they are likely also adapted to them, it is when you get the seasonal migration birds that come from a long ways which can carry unusual diseases. having any kind of congregating spot for them where they might mingle those diseases is probably not a great idea.

we encourage birds in our yard and gardens by having birdbaths, we don't feed them - those bags of bird seed can include invasive weeds - they are encouraged to forage for bugs and weed seeds. we keep the birdbaths washed out and cleaned at regular intervals. it seems to be working out ok.

if you want to feed the birds i would encourage you to plant things that they can eat throughout the year. we have some berry bushes which we can't eat but the birds are often in them throughout the winter months going after those berries and seeds.
 

Alasgun

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 11, 2021
Messages
1,088
Reaction score
4,530
Points
195
Location
S. Central Alaska
During the winter month’s i feed the local birds grass fed, organic Yak and Beef! However, im not a big bird fan And especially detest Robins for helping them selves to my Strawberries and my Worms! Netting keeps them out of the berries but they are hard on the worms.

Except for Magpies and a few tweety birds, all of our foul are migratory up here; even the Snow Birds🙄

I don’t normally fixate on bird diseases but i know they can be dirty buggers and just don’t encourage them to hang around. We had one tweety bird that lived up in the garden last season, eating some bugs and flitting around and that was kind of cool but that was one bird.
 
Last edited:

Alasgun

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 11, 2021
Messages
1,088
Reaction score
4,530
Points
195
Location
S. Central Alaska
Parsley, Celery and Artichokes are in starter pots now and the grow space has been flipped back to 2 shelves to accommodate all this.

Two of 4 light fixtures have been re-lamped and all tray’s and pots are clean and ready to go. In another week i’ll get the tomato’s going.

After noticing how early @catjac1975 started her onion seed, i followed suit and am looking at a nice batch of plants, and im optimistic they’ll be real nice in another 14 weeks at planting. It’s obvious to me that previous attempts at “seed onions” failed because i didn’t get them in early enough. In this case the package directions didn’t work out; doubling that time has proven valuable, thanks for posting that tidbit.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0766.jpeg
    IMG_0766.jpeg
    260.9 KB · Views: 25

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
16,053
Reaction score
24,170
Points
417
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
...
I don’t normally fixate on bird diseases but i know they can be dirty buggers and just don’t encourage them to hang around. We had one tweety bird that lived up in the garden last season, eating some bugs and flitting around and that was kind of cool but that was one bird.

even in the winter there are usually at least six species here every day. this without us feeding them. in the summer that can go up to 20 or more species. we're starting to see some of the migrants return now and with the longer days they are all more active.

the birds are not the major feeders on the strawberry patch here compared to the chipmunks, groundhogs and raccoons. i'm pretty much giving up on growing them for now and only get a few each season. if i get a chance this spring i'll turn that whole garden under.
 

catjac1975

Garden Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
8,962
Reaction score
8,940
Points
397
Location
Mattapoisett, Massachusetts
Parsley, Celery and Artichokes are in starter pots now and the grow space has been flipped back to 2 shelves to accommodate all this.

Two of 4 light fixtures have been re-lamped and all tray’s and pots are clean and ready to go. In another week i’ll get the tomato’s going.

After noticing how early @catjac1975 started her onion seed, i followed suit and am looking at a nice batch of plants, and im optimistic they’ll be real nice in another 14 weeks at planting. It’s obvious to me that previous attempts at “seed onions” failed because i didn’t get them in early enough. In this case the package directions didn’t work out; doubling that time has proven valuable, thanks for posting that tidbit.
Our seasons and climates are so different, I hope I did not lead you astray. But you were the reason I started some tomatoes in September, planning for ripe tomatoes in my greenhouse for early spring. I have green cherry tomatoes already and my toddler grandchildren are shaking with excitement.
 

Alasgun

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 11, 2021
Messages
1,088
Reaction score
4,530
Points
195
Location
S. Central Alaska
Inspiring each other is what it’s about! Don’t worry about leading me astray, astray is a perspective! After being told “you have an interesting perspective” by a boss once i told him; “ I’ve always lived life swimming up-stream. If you live your life floating down the river like everyone else you dont see or learn much because all the rocks are washed clean from the current. However; swimming up-stream you become stronger and get to look at all the cool stuff that happens on the backside of those rocks. It’s where the fish stay, where the little bugs the fish eat stay and all the interesting foliage is on the backside.” I keep a bag packed by the door in case someone comes along wanting to “go astray”!🙄

I usually just grow set onions but due to seasonal length they are never bigger than a lemon. I read that seed started onions were the answer to that and that they would catch up to and pass sets. Well, not up here, so i’ve stayed away from them for that reason. Your post turned on a light for me, hence; i’m trying again. I still have set’s coming but will get an opportunity to compare both.

Toddlers shaking with excitement is a nice thing!
 

catjac1975

Garden Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2010
Messages
8,962
Reaction score
8,940
Points
397
Location
Mattapoisett, Massachusetts
Inspiring each other is what it’s about! Don’t worry about leading me astray, astray is a perspective! After being told “you have an interesting perspective” by a boss once i told him; “ I’ve always lived life swimming up-stream. If you live your life floating down the river like everyone else you dont see or learn much because all the rocks are washed clean from the current. However; swimming up-stream you become stronger and get to look at all the cool stuff that happens on the backside of those rocks. It’s where the fish stay, where the little bugs the fish eat stay and all the interesting foliage is on the backside.” I keep a bag packed by the door in case someone comes along wanting to “go astray”!🙄

I usually just grow set onions but due to seasonal length they are never bigger than a lemon. I read that seed started onions were the answer to that and that they would catch up to and pass sets. Well, not up here, so i’ve stayed away from them for that reason. Your post turned on a light for me, hence; i’m trying again. I still have set’s coming but will get an opportunity to compare both.

Toddlers shaking with excitement is a nice thing!
Onions from seed grow really big for me.
 

Branching Out

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Dec 2, 2022
Messages
1,444
Reaction score
4,606
Points
175
Location
Southwestern B.C.
You were the reason I started some tomatoes in September, planning for ripe tomatoes in my greenhouse for early spring. I have green cherry tomatoes already and my toddler grandchildren are shaking with excitement.
We are indeed each other's inspiration. Alasgun, you were the reason I started a couple of Bushcrop cucumber seeds on January 13th. The two plants each have 4 large leaves now, so yesterday they got bumped up to tall 4" pots. I think I even see what may be blossoms forming. 🧐
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20240218_135812793.jpg
    IMG_20240218_135812793.jpg
    229.2 KB · Views: 18
  • IMG_20240218_135643689~2.jpg
    IMG_20240218_135643689~2.jpg
    308.4 KB · Views: 18

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
16,053
Reaction score
24,170
Points
417
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
Onions from seed grow really big for me.

variety selection can be a big influence. the largest onions we've grown here are called Kelsae and since we could not get those last year we grew Candy. both are milder onions but some will get fairly large - excellent soil conditions and regular irrigation required. i think Kelsae is more reliably larger, but i only have the one year to go by so far with them.
 

Latest posts

Top